Lining Up That Putt May Have Serious Consequences

An argument over slow play leads to a gun being drawn

View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    Getty Images
    For the love of god, Tiger, just play your shot!

    Every now and then, a golfer will get so frustrated by the slow play of the group ahead that a ball will whiz into or just past one of the offending golfers. That seems pretty aggressive, unless you're Edwin Dailey of Austin, Texas

    Dailey, 73, was playing behind Matt Nader and friends on Monday when he lost his temper about how long it was taking for them to finish a hole. He approached them at the ninth hole to complain and the squabbling continued throughout the round. At one point, according to an affadavit, Dailey threatened to get his gun to make him and Nader "equal." 

    When the round finally ended, Dailey decided to make good on his threat. He told the other men he felt threatened, and then pulled out a .25-caliber handgun loaded with hollow-point bullets. Scary situation, especially for someone with a heart problem. Nader happens to be just such a person. He was headed to the University of Texas on a football scholarship before going into cardiac arrest during a high school game.  

    The men scattered but dialed 911 when Dailey went into the clubhouse.

    He later returned while they were on the phone and said, "If I feel threatened, I am morally obligated to destroy you," according to the affidavit.

    Say this for Dailey, you can't accuse him of being a cafeteria golf course lunatic. He takes a hardline when it comes to moral questions. He had another gun in his car, plus two additional magazines, so you know slow play really gets on his nerves. You'd imagine traffic is a real pet peeve of his as well, which makes it lovely to hear that he travels with a pair of easily reached weapons.

    Dailey was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and released on $15,000 bail.  

    Josh Alper is a writer living in New York City and is a contributor to FanHouse.com and ProFootballTalk.com in addition to his duties for NBCNewYork.com.