<![CDATA[NBC4 Washington - Politics]]>Copyright 2017http://www.nbcwashington.com/news/politics http://media.nbcnewyork.com/designimages/WASH+NBC4+BLUE.png NBC4 Washington http://www.nbcwashington.comen-usTue, 27 Jun 2017 17:13:26 -0400Tue, 27 Jun 2017 17:13:26 -0400NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[Huckabee Sanders Vs. Reporters Over Latest Fake News Tirade]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 16:35:13 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/Huckabee_Sanders_Argues_With_WH_Reporters_Over_Latest_Fake_News_Tirade-149859458713000001.jpg

White House deputy press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders displayed the White House's antagonism against the media in full view, following heated exchanges between Huckabee Sanders and members of the White House press corp during a Tuesday press briefing. Huckabee Sanders pointed to a retracted CNN story as basis of the White House's "frustration" and skepticism with ongoing coverage, while one reporter accused the White House of inflammatory rhetoric.

]]>
<![CDATA[WH Warns Syria Against Chemical Attack 'Preparations']]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 10:51:34 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/TrumpAssad.jpg

The United States is warning that Syria would "pay a heavy price" for undertaking another chemical weapons attack, the White House said Monday night, saying it's spotted "potential preparations" for one, NBC News reported.

Activity at an airfield struck in the American cruise missile attack in April is "strongly suggestive" of the Assad regime intending to use chemical weapons, with the activity becoming more compelling in the last day, a Pentagon spokesman said Tuesday.

Five U.S. defense, military and intelligence officials told NBC News the statement caught them off guard.

A Syrian minister dismissed the statement, insisting Damascus does not have and will not use chemical weapons. Russian officials responded to the statements Tuesday, accusing the U.S. of "readying a new attack on Syrian forces" and preparing an "unprecedented provocation... presented as a chemical attack" to prompt a U.S.-led strike on Assad's forces.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Here's What Happens if the GOP Health Care Bill Becomes Law]]> Mon, 26 Jun 2017 20:12:40 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/mcconnellhealthfeuerherd.jpg

The Senate Republican health care bill would insure 22 million fewer people after a decade than current law, according to an analysis Monday by the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office. 

The GOP bill, titled the Better Care Reconciliation Act, would save $321 billion in the same period by spending $1 trillion less on health care and using the savings to repeal the Affordable Care Act’s taxes, which primarily benefit wealthy individuals and medical companies, NBC News reported.

In addition to increasing the number of uninsured Americans, the plan also would raise deductibles by large amounts and reduce Medicaid spending by 26 percent by 2026 versus current law.

On the other hand, it would achieve traditional conservative goals of spending less on social services, lowering tax rates on high earners and businesses, and reducing regulations on what kind of plans insurers must provide and on how much they’re allowed to profit off consumers.



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Who's Affected by the Supreme Court’s Travel Ban Ruling?]]> Mon, 26 Jun 2017 21:34:09 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/AP_17135611381402-Travel-Ban-Protest-Seattle-Court.jpg

The Supreme Court’s decision to reinstate parts of the Trump administration’s travel ban is potentially good news for many who want entry into the United States, but it may be a blow for refugees, experts told NBC News.

Uncertainty surrounded the impact of the high court's action. Several federal agencies must now decide how they will implement it, and advocates warned the confusion itself is harmful, given the delicacy of the refugee process.

While the court ruled the ban could partly take effect while it makes a final decision later this year, it said the ban could not apply at this time to anyone with "a credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States." The picture is potentially very different for refugees, though it’s unclear at the moment.

"We know that people are going to be hurt by this, and there will be a lot of disruption and dislocation," said Lavinia Limón, president and chief executive of the U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants.



Photo Credit: AP Photo/Ted S. Warren]]>
<![CDATA[Seniors Concerned Health Care Plan is 'Age Tax']]> Mon, 26 Jun 2017 13:22:30 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/senior-health-care.jpg

A Senate Republican proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act aims to reduce funding for Medicaid, the single largest source of health care coverage in the United States.

Organizations like AARP are concerned that the cuts unfairly target senior citizens.

AARP Executive Vice President Nancy LeaMond said in a statement that the Senate bill imposes an “age tax” on older adults.

“AARP is adamantly opposed to the Age Tax, which would allow insurance companies to charge older Americans five times more for coverage than everyone else while reducing tax credits that help make insurance more affordable,” LeaMond noted.

The advocacy organization notes on its website that the current law keeps insurers from charging older adults more than three times as much for premiums as they charge those who are younger for the same coverage. Both the Republican House and Senate legislation would "allow insurers to charge older adults five times as much, and states could receive waivers to remove even that limit."

Jerome Mosman agrees with the “age tax” characterization.

Mosman is the CEO of Sixty & Better, a nonprofit that provides nutrition and socialization services to senior citizens at 25 activity centers across Tarrant County in Texas.

“I think it is an Age Tax because there is a presumption that all older people are sicker, and this is not true,” Mosman said.

“To lose that [Medicaid] safety net is frightening. States are ultimately going to have to ration [their allotment] and say, ‘Well, we only get so much from Medicaid, therefore we cannot insure more disabled people, more elderly people.’ It is frightening for those on low income,” Mosman said.

At the age of 71, Anita Strange — a retired school teacher and lifelong Fort Worth resident — was dropped by her health insurance company, Aetna, which Strange believes was a direct result of her age.

Since then, Strange, now 74, has been enrolled in Medicare.

“I’m watching [the developments] but I’m just going to wait and see [before I pass judgment],” Strange said. “There’s got to be a better plan out there for us because we have to have insurance.”

Republicans have been said to be considering a vote this week, though the bill has a narrow path to victory with Democrats united against it and some moderates and conservatives calling for changes. 

A Congressional Budget Office analysis of the number of people likely to keep coverage under the bill is due out this week. Twenty-three million people would lose insurance under the House version of the legislation, the CBO said last month. 

"Republican Senators are working very hard to get there, with no help from the Democrats," Trump tweeted on Monday. "Not easy! Perhaps just let OCare crash & burn!"



Photo Credit: NBC 5 News]]>
<![CDATA['Lets Not Rush This': Senators Urge Health Care Vote Delay]]> Sun, 25 Jun 2017 10:56:26 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/ronjohnsonfeuerherd.jpg

Senators on both sides of the aisle can agree on at least one thing: rushing a vote on health care would be ill-advised, NBC News reported. 

Republican senators unveiled their version of the health bill on Thursday, and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has indicated he wants to see a vote before the end of this week. 

Both Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisc., and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., who each have expressed serious reservations with the bill for very different reasons, said during exclusive interviews on Sunday's "Meet The Press" that rushing a vote before the July 4th recess would be unwise. 

Sanders said: "There is no way on God’s Earth that this bill should be passed this week. The people of Wisconsin don’t know what’s in it, the people of Vermont don’t know what’s in it. We need a serious discussion."



Photo Credit: J. Scott Applewhite/AP]]>
<![CDATA[Trump Acknowledges Russian Election ‘Meddling’ in Tweet]]> Sat, 24 Jun 2017 23:11:52 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/trump-face-wahhh.jpg

President Donald Trump appeared to acknowledge Russian meddling in the presidential election on Twitter Friday, attacking former President Barack Obama.

"Just out," Trump tweeted, "The Obama Administration knew far in advance of November 8th about election meddling by Russia. Did nothing about it. WHY?"

Trump may have been referencing a Washington Post report that the CIA had confirmed Russian President Vladimir Putin’s direct influence on his government's alleged interference in the 2016 election.

Trump on Saturday tried to shift the attention on the Obama administration for Russian interference. "Focus on them, not T!" the president tweeted.



Photo Credit: Evan Vucci/AP]]>
<![CDATA[Poll: Dems, GOP Divided on Virginia Shooting Motivation]]> Sat, 24 Jun 2017 19:45:21 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/scalisesavedbypolice.jpg

Data from this month’s NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll shows that partisan identity significantly affected how Americans viewed the shooting on Republican lawmakers at a congressional baseball practice in Alexandria, Virginia, last Wednesday.

By a 20 point margin, 52 percent to 32 percent, more Republicans than Democrats called the shooting a result of political rhetoric. A majority of Democrats — 55 percent — called it an isolated incident, while 37 percent of Republicans said the same.

The public overall was closely divided. Forty-one percent cited political rhetoric, while 46 percent said the shooting was an isolated case.

The NBC/WSJ poll was conducted June 17-20 of 900 adults — including more than 400 by cell phone — and it has an overall margin of error of plus-minus 3.3 percentage points.



Photo Credit: AP Photo/Alex Brandon]]>
<![CDATA[Trump WH Has Taken Little Action to Stop Next Election Hack]]> Sat, 24 Jun 2017 06:31:09 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/180*120/GettyImages-632915364.jpg

The Trump administration has taken little meaningful action to prevent Russian hacking, leaking and disruption in the next national election in 2018, despite warnings from intelligence officials that it will happen again, officials and experts told NBC News.

Former FBI Director James Comey recently told senators during Congressional testimony that Trump never asked him about how to stop a future Russian election cyberattack. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who sits on the National Security Council, testified that he has not received a classified briefing on Russian election interference.

Dozens of state officials told NBC News they have received little direction from Washington about election security. White House spokesman Sean Spicer said this week he had never addressed the matter with Trump.

That apparent indifference, coupled with a failure to fill key federal agency jobs, has resulted in a government paralyzed by inaction when it comes to protecting the next election, experts and government officials told NBC News.



Photo Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[More Americans Believe Comey Over Trump: Poll]]> Fri, 23 Jun 2017 14:06:02 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/james-comey-donald-trump-hearing.jpg

By a 2-to-1 margin, Americans say they are more likely to believe former FBI Director James Comey than President Donald Trump in regard to their differing accounts of the events that led up to Comey’s firing, according to a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll.

Forty-five percent of respondents say they are more likely to believe Comey's version of events from his June 8 testimony to the U.S. Senate, versus 22 percent who are more likely to believe what Trump has said, NBC News reported.

Eight percent of respondents said they believe both Trump and Comey, while 21 percent responded that they believe neither of them.

By party, 76 percent of Democrats side with Comey, while 50 percent of Republicans believe Trump. Independents break for Comey over Trump, 47 percent to 17 percent.

The NBC/WSJ poll was conducted June 17-20 of 900 adults — including more than 400 by cell phone — and it has an overall margin of error of plus-minus 3.3 percentage points.





Photo Credit: Getty Images, File]]>
<![CDATA[Medical Groups Hate the 'Heartless' Senate Health Care Plan]]> Fri, 23 Jun 2017 13:11:45 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/180*120/GettyImages-699840802.jpg

Both versions of the Republican plan to fix the American health care system would make things worse, not better, according to groups that represent a variety of physicians.

NBC News reported that pediatrician, cancer specialist, cardiologist and family doctor groups were denouncing the Senate version of the bill within hours of its release Thursday.

"The Senate draft health care bill is literally heartless," American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown said.

Among the reasons so many medical professionals oppose the changes Republicans have proposed to the Affordable Care Act, or "Obamacare," is that it reduces funding for Medicaid, the state-federal health plan that covers many low-income, disabled and pregnant people, as well as a large portion of American children.



Photo Credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Boeing Factory Where Trump Touted US Jobs Set for Layoffs]]> Fri, 23 Jun 2017 14:18:18 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/Trump-Boeing.jpg

Workers at a South Carolina Boeing factory are bracing themselves for layoffs just five months after President Donald Trump visited the plant "to celebrate jobs."

Boeing confirmed on Thursday that up to 200 employees would be let go from the North Charleston location. Also this week, CNBC reported reported that Carrier will make cuts at its factory in Indianapolis.

Both plants were important backdrops in the president's push to preserve American jobs.

In South Carolina, part of the assembly line that produces the Boeing 787-10 Dreamliner aircraft, Trump promised to "fight for every last American job" during a campaign-style rally in February.

And Trump vowed that "companies are not going to leave the United States anymore without consequences" at the Carrier plant in Indiana less than a month after winning the election.

But Boeing said in a statement that it was cutting jobs, part of a plan announced in December, citing "relentless" competition.

"That has made clear our need as a company to reduce cost to be more competitive," Boeing said. "We are offering resources to those affected by layoffs to help them in finding other employment and ease their transition as much as possible."

Boeing has already eliminated more than 13,000 jobs in the past year.

In December, Carrier announced it received a $7 million tax break from Indiana, where Vice President Mike Pence was governor, on the same day Trump took a tour. The tax break was an incentive to keep jobs on American soil, contingent on meeting certain employment, job retention and investment goals.

But CNBC reports that the company will layoff 600 employees. At the time, 1,400 workers were slated to be laid off. But the deal only seemed to save 800 union workers.



Photo Credit: Sean Rayford / Getty Images]]>