Thousands Rally, March in Nationwide Anti-Trump Protests | NBC4 Washington
Decision 2016

Decision 2016

Full coverage of the race for the White House

Thousands Rally, March in Nationwide Anti-Trump Protests

Despite calls for calm from city officials, rowdy protests in Portland, Oregon, resulted in multiple arrests Saturday

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    Thousands of protesters march in reaction to the upset election of Republican Donald Trump over Democrat Hillary Clinton in the race for President of the United States on Nov. 12, 2016, in Los Angeles, California, United States. Hundreds of Angelenos have been arrested in recent days and some have vandalized property but the vast majority of the thousands of protesters have remain peaceful. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

    Thousands took to the streets Saturday across the United States as demonstrations against President-elect Donald Trump continued in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and beyond.

    Protesters rallied at New York's Union Square before picking up steam and taking their cause toward Trump Tower. Police set up barricades in front of some of the most expensive stores in Manhattan as the group made its way along Fifth Avenue.

    "I just can't have Donald Trump running this country and teaching our children racism, sexism and bigotry," said Noemi Abad, 30, a fashion designer, as she marched down the famous road. "Out of his own mouth he made this division. He needs to go — there's no place for racism in society in America."

    Trump's comments — particularly a 2005 recording of him making lewd comments about women — sparked outrage during his campaign. That spilled over into a fourth day of demonstrations following an election that ended with half of U.S. voters choosing the other candidate, Hillary Clinton.

    Trump Booed Leaving New York Times

    [NATL] Trump Booed Leaving New York Times
    President Elect Donald Trump is booed as he walks through the lobby of The New York Times Building after a 75-minute meeting with Times journalists. The lobby of the Times building is open to the public, and a large crowd had gathered by the time he departed. (Published Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2016)

    In Los Angeles, several thousand people marched through downtown streets Saturday to condemn what they saw as Trump's hate speech about Muslims, pledge to deport people in the country illegally and crude comments about women.

    Jennifer Cruz, 18, of Ventura, California, carried a sign that asked: "Legalize weed but not my Mom?" — a reference to Californians' Tuesday passage of a measure legalizing recreational marijuana use.

    Cruz said her parents have been in the United States illegally for 30 years, although her mother has spent years seeking citizenship. She called the possibility of their deportation terrifying.

    "We talk about it almost every day," she said. "My Mom wants to leave it in the hands of God but I'm not just going to sit back and not do anything. I'm going to fight for my parents, even if it kills me."

    Trump Takes Meetings at His New Jersey Golf Club

    [NATL] Trump Takes Meetings at His New Jersey Golf Club
    President-elect Trump interviewed more than a dozen candidates for his administration at his New Jersey golf club over the weekend, including Mitt Romney, Rudy Guliani, Chris Christie and Kansas secretary of state Kris Kobach, who has been tough on immigration, and others. (Published Monday, Nov. 21, 2016)

    "He doesn't realize all the families he's hurting," she said of Trump.

    Shawn Smith, 41, of Los Angeles, wore an American flag vest and held a glittery sign that said "Love Trumps Hate."

    "What he's been able to do is make 50 percent of the nation look over their shoulder," he said. "If you're gay, if you're LGBT, if you're Muslim, if you're Latin, if you're special needs, if you're female, it's a much unsafer place now."

    "What is happening today is going to be the normal for a while," he said of the demonstration, "because we're not going to just sit back and watch our rights being taken away, our health care being taken away."

    Around 1,000 people gathered in downtown Chicago on Saturday to protest Trump’s election victory for the fourth consecutive day. Demonstrators marched on Michigan Avenue and paused briefly near Trump Tower to chant before continuing north toward the Dirksen Federal Building.

    Several hundred people have marched through Richmond, Virginia, in a demonstration began at Virginia Commonwealth University on Saturday. Protesters carried signs and chanted "we reject the president elect" and "my fist goes up until Trump steps down."

    Similar demonstrations took place in Providence, Rhode Island, Iowa City, Iowa, and Worcester, Massachusetts.

    Protests were mainly peaceful, but in Portland, Oregon, a man who was participating in a Friday night march was shot after a confrontation with someone in a vehicle. Police expect the man to survive and detained four people in connection with the shooting. A motive for the shooting was unclear. The four people detained are believed to be gang members, but the victim is not.

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    The shooting followed rowdy Friday night protests, when police used tear gas in response to "burning projectiles" thrown at officers, police said on Twitter. Hundreds of people marched through the city, disrupting traffic and spray-painting graffiti.

    "Going to the streets for another night is not going to keep Donald Trump from taking office. It isn’t going to change anything," Portland Mayor Charlie Hales said at a Saturday news conference, NBC affilitate KGW-TV reported.

    Still, several hundred protestors took to Portland's streets again Saturday, despite the mayor's words, and police made multiple arrests after protesters threw bottles and blocked streets and light rail lines. The exact number of arrests wasn't immediately available.

    Authorities say nearly a thousand protesters marched on the Las Vegas strip sidewalks in an anti-Trump demonstration.

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    [NATL] Clinton Reflects on Defeat: 'Never, Ever Give Up'
    Hillary Clinton is reflecting on her devastating defeat, acknowledging the difficulty of her loss for her supporters and urging them to persevere through the Donald Trump era. She is encouraging her backers to "never, ever give up."

    Making her first public appearance Wednesday evening since her emotional concession speech a week earlier, Clinton said: "It's up to each and every one of us to keep working to make America better and stronger and fairer." (Published Thursday, Nov. 17, 2016)

    Las Vegas Police Captain Christopher Tomaino said late Saturday that seven people were arrested on charges that they blocked traffic on Las Vegas Boulevard after a vocal but otherwise peaceful demonstration at the Trump hotel.

    In other parts of the country, spirited demonstrations on college campuses and peaceful marches along downtown streets have taken place since Wednesday.

    Evening marches disrupted traffic in Miami and Atlanta.

    Trump supporter Nicolas Quirico was traveling from South Beach to Miami. His car was among hundreds stopped when protesters blocked Interstate 395.

    "Trump will be our president. There is no way around that, and the sooner people grasp that, the better off we will be," he said. "There is a difference between a peaceful protest and standing in a major highway backing up traffic for 5 miles. This is wrong."

    Protests also were held in Philadelphia; Detroit; Minneapolis; Kansas City, Missouri; Olympia, Washington, Iowa City and more.

    More than 200 people, carrying signs, gathered on the steps of the Washington state Capitol. The group chanted "not my president" and "no Trump, no KKK, no fascist USA."

    In Tennessee, Vanderbilt University students sang civil rights songs and marched through campus across a Nashville street, temporarily blocking traffic.

    WATCH: Obama Welcomes Trump to the White House

    [NATL] WATCH: Obama Welcomes Trump to the White House
    President Barack Obama welcomed President-elect Donald Trump to the White House Thursday for a private meeting in the Oval Office. After spending roughly 90 minutes together the pair made a brief statement to reporters. Obama said he was "encouraged" by the wide-ranging conversation the pair had, adding that it's important "we call come together" to face the challenges America faces. Trump added that he "very much looks forward" to dealing with President Obama in the future and will rely on his "counsel" (Published Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016)

    In Cincinnati, hundreds of protesters had already taken to the streets early Saturday afternoon to peacefully protest the jury's deadlock in the trial of a former white police officer who killed an unarmed black motorist in 2015.

    A mistrial was declared in the trial of former University of Cincinnati officer Ray Tensing. He was fired after shooting Sam DuBose in the head after pulling him over for a missing front license plate last year.

    Anti-Trump protesters had joined up with trial protesters and marched through downtown.

    In Chicago, hundreds of people including families with small children chanted "No hate. No fear. Immigrants are welcome here" Saturday as they marched through Millennium Park, a popular downtown tourist attraction.

    Obama: ‘We Are All on One Team’

    [NATL] Obama: ‘We Are All on One Team’
    President Barack Obama, addressing the nation on Nov. 9, urged the country to come together after a divisive election season. “We are all on one team. This is an intramural scrimmage. We are not Democrats first. We are not Republicans first,” Obama said. “We are Americans first. (Published Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016)

    Sonja Spray, 29, who heard about the protest on Facebook, said she has signed an online petition urging the electoral college to honor the popular vote and elect Clinton.

    "Women aren't playthings. Journalists aren't pawns. People of color are not commodities. Marriage equality is not up for debate," Spray said.

    Ashley Lynne Nagel, 27, said she joined a Thursday night demonstration in Denver.

    "It's not that we're sore losers," said Nagel, a Bernie Sanders supporter who voted for Clinton. "It's that we are genuinely upset, angry, terrified that a platform based off of racism, xenophobia and homophobia has become so powerful and now has complete control of our representation."

    Hillary Clinton: 'I Still Believe in America'

    [NATL-NY] Hillary Clinton: 'I Still Believe in America'
    Hillary Clinton said she felt "pride and gratitude" for her campaign on Wednesday morning, hours after her shocking defeat at the hands of Donald Trump. (Published Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016)

    Demonstrations also took place internationally. A group of Mexicans at statue representing independence in Mexico City expressed their concerns about a possible wave of deportations. One school teacher said it would add to the "unrest" that's already in Mexico. About 300 people protested Trump's election as the next American president outside the U.S. Embassy near the landmark Brandenburg Gate in Berlin.

    President Barack Obama meets in Berlin next week with Chancellor Angela Merkel and several other European leaders, and is expected to confront global concerns about Trump's election.

    ___

    Jablon reported in Los Angeles. Associated Press writers William Mathis and Jonathan Lemire in New York, Lisa Baumann and Phuong Le in Seattle, Carla K. Johnson in Chicago, Terrence Petty in Portland, Oregon, and David Rising in Berlin contributed to this report.