Born Before Suffrage, 98-Year-Old Maryland Woman Votes for Hillary Clinton | NBC4 Washington
Decision 2016

Decision 2016

Full coverage of the race for the White House

Born Before Suffrage, 98-Year-Old Maryland Woman Votes for Hillary Clinton

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Estelle Schultz of Rockville, Maryland, was born before women had the right to vote. As a 98-year-old, she said she hopes to witness history in the presidential election this November. News4's Kristin Wright reports. (Published Monday, Oct. 24, 2016)

    Estelle Schultz was born before women had the right to vote, and she's hoping she will soon see the first woman president take office.

    Schultz, a 98-year-old Rockville, Maryland, resident recently cast her vote for Hillary Clinton.

    "I'm very thrilled to be able to be alive at this crucial election," she told News4.

    The great-grandmother said she never thought she would see the day a woman was so close to being voted into the White House. Schultz was born in 1918, two years before women across the United States got the vote in 1920.

    "I think it's the most exciting thing that can happen to women anywhere, anytime," she said.

    Schultz's daughter and granddaughter started a website called I Waited 96 Years! that is collecting the stories of women in their 90s or older who are casting their votes for Clinton. As of Monday evening, the site had stories and photos from nearly 20 women.

    “I am looking forward to the first female U.S. President. I believe Hillary will do an excellent job as president not because she is a woman but because she is most qualified," a 102-year-old Arizona woman, Geraldine "Jerry" Emmett, is quoted as saying.

    "I can't say how proud I am to get to vote for her," a 96-year-old Pennsylvania woman, Alice Siegel, is quoted as saying.

    Schultz, a New York native, retired 20 years ago as an assistant schools superintendent in Compton, California. She reads the paper every day and keeps up with every twist and turn of the presidential race.

    On one wall of her home hangs a photo of her as a 1-year-old, taken one year before women could vote.

    "If you have the privilege, grab it," she said.