Utah Rep. Wants to Stop D.C. Gay Marriage

Chaffetz files legislation to overturn bill

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    WASHINGTON, DC - Nov. 17: Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, talks to a reporter after he and fellow House Representatives-elect gathered on the East Front steps of the U.S. Capitol for a freshman class photo. Democrats bolstered their majority with a gain of 20 seats in the House in national elections in November. With 3 races still too close to call, the House will be 255 Democrats to 175 Republicans when the 111th Session of Congress convenes Jan. 6, 2009. (Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)

    A congressman from Utah has filed legislation that would overturn a D.C. bill allowing gay marriage.

    U.S. Rep. Jason Chaffetz, a Republican, has been warning D.C. that he would fight the bill, and on Tuesday he followed through by submitting his legislation.

    Gay marriage is not yet legal in the District, but the D.C. City Council passed a bill in December allowing the unions in the city. As we all know, because D.C. is a federal district and not a state, its laws must be sent to Congress before taking effect.

    Congress has 30 legislative days to act on the marriage bill before it takes effect. Chaffetz's legislation, a resolution of disapproval, would block the bill from taking effect.

    Chaffetz has said in the past it will be difficult to get Congress to block the District's bill because both houses are controlled by Democrats.

    "If it were put up for a vote, traditional marriage would win," Chaffetz told the Salt Lake Tribune in December. "It would win with a congressional vote, and it would win with the residents of Washington, D.C."