Think You Know How Much Snow Really Fell?

Enough liquid to fill 12 million Olympic pools

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    WASHINGTON - FEBRUARY 6: People walk on Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House after a snow storm February 6, 2010 in Washington, D.C. A record setting snowstorm has hit the Washington, D.C. area and more than two feet of snow are expected.(Photo by Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images)

    The amount of snow and rain that fell over the District, Maryland, and Virginia during our recent "snowpocalypse" boggles the mind.

    Folks from all over the area took their own unscientific measurements. Many of them stopped by News4 reporter Pat Collin's live shot in the District on Saturday to use his snow measuring stick.

    Greg Fall at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration used actual scientific calculations to come up with hard numbers. He looked at the liquid volume of snow and rain that fell on along the east coast during the Blizzard of 2010.

    Thirty billion cubic meters of water fell over 10 states and the District of Columbia. That's enough to fill 12 million Olympic-sized swimming pools.

    Here's another visual. The amount of snow and rain that came down would fill the Empire State Building 30,000 times. If you dumped that water into Lake Superior, it would increase the lake's depth by 14 inches.

    Those numbers only stand to increase with a potential Blizzard of 2010 the Sequel on its way.