The Night Note: 5/17/10

News you need to know.

By Brendan Williams-Kief
|  Monday, May 17, 2010  |  Updated 6:30 PM EDT
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The Night Note: Tweeting Indecision

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The following stories are brought to you by the fine folks on the News4 assignment desk.

MONTGOMERY COUNTY WANTS SPEED CAMERA SUIT DISMISSED
Montgomery County is trying to get rid of a lawsuit charging that the way it operates its speed camera program is illegal.

The lawsuit says the county is breaking Maryland law by paying a contractor by the ticket. Affiliated Computer Services records, prints and mails citations and collects ticket payments. It gets $16.25 per ticket.

Maryland law prohibits per ticket payments to camera operators, but officials say the county actually operates the camera system. (WTOP)

DON PEEBLES TWEETS HIS INDECISION
Real estate developer Don Peebles has been playing the "Maybe I will, maybe I won't" game since late last year on whether he'll jump into the District's mayoral contest. But even an admonition from WRC/NBC4's Tom Sherwood (or DCist's own Sommer Mathis, for that matter) hasn't made Peebles any more resolute on whether or not to run.

In a post over the weekend to what appears to be his brand new Twitter account, Peebles (assuming it's really him) again let the District's political establishment and his followers (all 24 of them as of this writing)know that he's ... still making up his mind. (DCist)

LOUD MUSIC COMPLAINT LEADS TO DRUG OPERATION
What started as a common complaint about loud music in Temple Hills turned into an all-out melee with police, resulting in the injury of two officers, the arrest of eight people, the recovery of more than $15,000 in drugs and the discovery of a 1-year-old hidden in a closet.

It started about 11 p.m. Friday. Two Prince George's County police officers responded to an apartment on the 3000 block of Brinkley Road and asked the party to turn down the music. The occupants complied -- initially.  (Washington Examiner)

NEXTBUS ACCURACY SLIPS
WMATA released NextBus accuracy statistics last week, and frequent users will not be surprised to find out that accuracy is not where it could be.

NextBus only has predictions for 78% of buses, far below the 92% accuracy target. The buses themselves are also not keeping to schedules particularly well, being "on time" only about 75% of the time even with a generous on time standard of up to 2 minutes early (which buses exceed almost 7% of the time) and 7 minutes late (which they exceed 18% of the time). (Greater Greater Washington)

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