The Night Note: 4/23/10

News you need to know.

View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    TK

    The following stories are brought to you by the fine folks on the News4 assignment desk.

    NEW METRO SAFETY CHIEF GETTING TO WORK
    After a busy first week on the job, which included a congressional hearing, Metro's new chief of safety says to expect some changes.

    "I'm assessing what the state of safety is right now to look at what we need to do to change the safety culture," Jim Dougherty tells WTOP.

    Dougherty enters Metro at a time when the spotlight on safety is at its apex. Four Metro employees have been killed on the job since August, and the one year anniversary of the horrific Red Line crash that killed 9 people -- including a train operator -- is approaching. (WTOP)

    IT'S A DELI!  IT'S AN IRISH PUB!
    Star and Shamrock Tavern and Deli is the latest eatery to sprout up on H Street NE. Doors opened last weekend for a soft opening period, and the restaurant's full menu rolls out tonight. Think deli with an occasional sprinkle of Irish/Jewish fusion sprinkled in.

    There's a fried food-heavy appetizer menu, featuring fried kosher pigs in a blanket, fried pickles, fried chicken livers, fried matzo balls, and latkes all priced at $5. (DCist)

    PARKING AUDIT FINDS THE MAYOR HAS SOME TICKETS
    Mayor Adrian M. Fenty and schools Chancellor Michelle A. Rhee are among city employees whose assigned vehicles have racked up unpaid parking and traffic fines, according to a new D.C. Auditor's report that found poor monitoring of the city's fleet, the employees authorized to drive city vehicles and fuel cards.

    A vehicle assigned to the mayor currently has $770 in unpaid fines while a vehicle designated for Rhee has $345. "As of the date of this report, the fines had not been paid," auditor Deborah K. Nichols wrote. (Washington Post)

    SIGNS, SIGNS, LOUDOUN COUNTY SIGNS
    It has been said that Loudoun County government was partially framed around the county’s Zoning Ordinance. More specifically, the ordinance’s regulation of commercial signs, commonly referred to as the sign ordinance.
     
    Loudoun’s sign ordinance has a long and staggered history of being too complex and overly restrictive. In addition to governing where, how large and what kind of signs a business can erect, the ordinance is often the cause of criticism for its strict application process, time-consuming wait for approval and hefty costs. (Loudoun Independent)