The Night Note: 02/03/11

News you need to know.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    The following stories are brought to you by the fine folks on the assignment desk.

    OPINIONS SPLIT ON OPENING FEATHERSTONE WILDLIFE REFUGE TO PUBLIC
    Inside NoVA: "A new 15-year conservation plan proposed by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service lead to the Featherstone National Wildlife Refuge in Woodbridge opening to the public for the first time.

    But area residents are split on whether or not that should happen.

    The 325-acre piece of land, surrounded on two sides by the Occoquan Bay and Neabsco Creek, was acquired by the FWS in 1979 and has been closed to the public ever since."

    SHERWOOD RUNAWAYS COULD FACE CHARGES

    Gazette.net: "Two Sherwood High School teens who were missing for more than two weeks have returned home, but there could be legal consequences for their escapade.

    The juvenile court system could charge and penalize Nicholas "Cole" Balderson, 17, of the 2300 block of Rose Branch Court in Brookeville and Rachel Reilly, 16, of the 18200 block of Wickham Drive in Olney, for running away Jan. 12, said Montgomery County Police spokeswoman Lucille Baur."

    HISTORIC PRESERVATION GROUP OBJECTS TO STREETCARS
    The Hill is Home: "Anyone even remotely familiar with the H Street NE development is aware that rails are being laid for the what is likely to be DC’s first streetcar line in half a century.

    But this is just the first leg in a system that may someday span the District, connecting areas currently difficult to reach by Metro, relieving overcrowded bus routes, and adding a whole new way to get around the city. Phase 1 of the Streetcar System Concept Plan calls for for a line up Barracks Row, on a north/south run to the Navy Yard and points east of the river and connecting with H Street to the north."

    MD INVESTIGATING PEPCO FOR OVERCHARGING CUSTOMERS

    Washington Examiner: "Maryland officials have started an investigation into Pepco for charging thousands of customers during power outages for the last four years.

    The Maryland Public Service Commission, which regulates the state's utilities, says ratepayers who are on Pepco's rate stabilization plan may be paying for power although the power is out.

    Commissioners say the plan's billing system "may be allowing the company to recover revenues lost during extended outages, and thus may have unwittingly eliminated a critical incentive to restore service quickly," according to documents initiating the investigation."