The Night Note: 11/27/09

News you need to know.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK

    The following stories are brought to you by the fine folks on the News4 assignment desk.

    TIGER IN GOOD CONDITION AFTER ACCIDENT
    A local police chief in Florida says Tiger Woods' wife used a golf club to smash out the back window and helped get the golfer out of the car.

    Windermere Police Chief Daniel Saylor told The Associated Press on Friday that Elin Nordegren told officers she was in the house when she heard the accident and came outside. Saylor says officers found Woods laying in the street with his wife hovering over him. (NBC Washington)

    DINNER CRASHERS MET OBAMA
    A White House official says the Virginia couple who attended a state dinner without an invitation met President Barack Obama in the receiving line.

    Michaele and Tareq Salahi were admitted into Tuesday's dinner for India's visiting prime minister although they were not on the official guest list of more than 300 people. It had been unclear how close they may have gotten to Obama. (WTOP)

    HOMELESS SHELTERS REACHING CAPACITY FOR WOMEN
    This is going to be an especially tough season for the homeless. The number of homeless families jumped in recent months. For the week of Nov. 9 to Nov. 15, there were 429 families on the waiting list for services. Ten families who had applied for shelter returned to seek services again. Of the nearly 30 families who asked that week for services, the majority were turned away and sought shelter with relatives.

    And this week, shelters for women reached capacity. (Washington City Paper)

    THIRSTY CAMELS THREATEN AUSTRALIAN TOWN
    Australian authorities plan to corral about 6,000 wild camels with helicopters and gun them down after they overran a small Outback town in search of water, trampling fences, smashing tanks and contaminating supplies.

    The Northern Territory government announced its plan Wednesday for Docker River, a town of 350 residents where thirsty camels have been arriving daily for weeks because of drought conditions in the region. (MSNBC)