The Night Note: 11/23/09

News you need to know.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK

    The following stories are brought to you by the fine folks on the News4 assignment desk.

    2.1 MILLION DROP-SIDE CRIBS RECALL
    Government safety regulators say more than 2.1 million dropside cribs by Stork Craft are being recalled, the biggest crib recall in U.S history.

    The Consumer Product Safety Commission says the recall involves 1.2 million cribs in the United States and almost 1 million in Canada, where Stork Craft is based.

    Nearly 150,000 of the cribs on recall carry the Fisher-Price logo. (MSNBC)

    REALITY TV: VA MAN CHARGED WITH STEALING 100 SETS
    A Virginia man has been arrested on charges of stealing more than 100 flat screen TVs from Fort Belvoir.

    Stephen Don Carter, 36, was charged in federal court in Alexandria, Va., with theft of government property, the Washington Examiner reported.

    Carter posted a $50,000 bond. If convicted he faces up to 10 years in prison. Carter worked with a stockroom manager at the army installation's store to take the TVs, officials said. A total of 102 televisions were stolen in four trips. (NBC Washington)

    THREE MILE ISLAND LEAK PROBED
    Federal officials are investigating a radiation leak at Three Mile Island, scene of the worst U.S. nuclear power accident, but said on Sunday there was no threat to public health or safety.

    Investigators were trying to determine the cause of radiological contamination inside the nuclear facility's containment building on Saturday afternoon.

    About 150 people were working in a TMI containment building when the contamination was detected and some were exposed to low levels of radiation, a Nuclear Regulatory Commission spokesman said. (Reuters)

    DISTRICT SETTLES MASS ARREST CASE FOR $13.7 MILLION
    Within 20 minutes of a hearing in federal court this afternoon, the District and plaintiffs attorneys settled a class-action lawsuit stemming from mass arrests and a police raid during the April 2000 anti-globalization protests. The suit involves roughly 600 people arrested. The District agreed to a record $13.7 million payout.

    “We are pleased with the settlement," says plaintiffs lawyer Carl Messineo. "It’s a historic settlement and it’s actually a fair deal for the District."

    Legal Times reported this may be the largest payout in the U.S. for wrongfully arrested protesters. (Washington City Paper)