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Some Rally Against Bi-County Parkway

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Some Prince William County residents are lashing out at the Virginia Department of Transportation. They want to block plans for the bi-county parkway, a proposed 10-mile highway that would cut through the western part of the historic Manassas National Battlefield. Northern Virginia Bureau reporter David Culver breaks down the controversy.

    Some Prince William County residents are lashing out at the Virginia Department of Transportation over the proposed Bi-County parkway.

    The planned 10-mile corridor would cut through the western part of the historic Manassas National Battlefield Park, while the existing Route 234 within the park would be abandoned. It runs from Interstate 66 to Route 50 in Loudoun County.

    More than 150 years after the Civil War, the battle is still raging on Page Snyders' historic property.

    "This is like the tenth battle for us. It just is constant, on and on and on," Snyders said.

    Snyders is fighting VDOT to save her land from the construction. She pointed out sites of where Union and Confederate soldiers are buried. This is also an unfinished railroad that has still been preserved.

    Standing by Snyders is her former nemesis turned fellow advocate, Maryann Ghadban - a developer.

    "This is a huge negative impact for Prince William County; it's the dumping of Prince William County," Ghadban said of the parkway.

    But at a public forum Thursday night, VDOT explained to county residents the workings of the project. They say it's necessary in order to reduce traffic congestion.

    Project Manager Tom Fahrney addressed some of the misconceptions.

    "That this is an outer beltway or western bypass, clearly it's not. It runs from I-66 to Route 50. We are not studying this project north of Route 50," he said.

    Meantime Snyders, a democrat, is turning to a republican for help. She's hosting a rally with candidate for governor Ken Cuccinelli Saturday. He told bureau chief Julie Carey on Friday, he's against the project as it currently stands.

    Snyders is confident in how this battle will end.

    "We know we're going to win," she said.