Remembering the Titanic Disaster 100 Years Later | NBC4 Washington

Remembering the Titanic Disaster 100 Years Later

Tribute on D.C. Waterfront includes band, luminaries

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    NEWSLETTERS

    News4's Darcy Spencer reports on ceremonies that commemorated the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the "unsinkable" ship. (Published Monday, April 16, 2012)

    On this day 100 years ago the world was learning of one of history's biggest tragedies at sea: the sinking of the Titanic.

    The massive ship left Southampton, England bound for New York and hit an iceberg at 11:40 p.m. on the evening of April 14, 1912. It sank less than three hours later.

    A cruise retracing Titanic's doomed voyage reached its destination Sunday morning. The "Azamara Journey" sailed to the site where the Titanic went down, approximately 375 miles south of the coast of Newfoundland, Canada. Those on board held a memorial for the disaster victims.

    In the District, dozens paid their own respects to the victims of the disaster at the Titanic Memorial along the Southwest waterfront. A band played a compilation of songs that were heard on the ship while the waterfront's promenade was lined with luminaries, each bearing the name of a person or crew member who died in the sinking.

    Meanwhile, James Delgado, the director of maritime heritage at the National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration (NOAA) says forensic evidence indicates signs of human remains at the shipwreck site.

    Delgado said Saturday that one 2004 photograph shows a coat and boots in the mud on the ocean floor. He says the way the items are "laid out'' makes a "compelling case'' that it is where "someone has come to rest.''

     Delgado released the full image this week to coincide with the disaster's centenary. It was previously seen in a cropped version. The photo was taken during a NOAA expedition.

    The Newseum on Pennsylvania Avenue will commemorate 100 years since the Titanic tragedy by hosting a special called "Inside Media." The program features scientists who have played key roles in the study and preservation of the Titanic. That program begins at 2:30 p.m. Sunday.

    Also at the Newseum, you can see how the media chronicled the tragic event. An exhibit outside displays images from 28 newspapers from 1912. Those papers will be featured through Friday.