Police Shooting Victim's Father Hopes for Peace of Mind After Indictment | NBC4 Washington

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Police Shooting Victim's Father Hopes for Peace of Mind After Indictment

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    Almost two years after a Fairfax County police officer shot and killed a man during a standoff at his home, the officer who allegedly pulled the trigger will face murder charges. (Published Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015)

    Don Geer hopes for some peace of mind after a long wait for the prosecution of the police officer who shot and killed his son to begin.

    He was there two years ago this month when former Fairfax County Police Officer Adam Torres shot and killed his unarmed son, John Geer, during a standoff with police.

    Now a panel of grand jurors sees the incident the same way as Don Geer -- as a crime.

    “I feel that things have worked out the way I liked,” he said. “Just unfortunate we've had to take two years to get there.”

    Torres told investigators he had seen John Geer's hands go toward his waist, as if reaching for a weapon. However, Geer's father and other police officers said Geer's hands were held up when he was shot.

    John Geer's close friend Jeff Stewart also witnessed the shooting and testified before the grand jury.

    “The grand jury heard the evidence and made the right decision,” he said. “I'll trust the jury, if it does go to trial, will hear evidence and make the right decision.”

    Fairfax County Commonwealth's Attorney Ray Morrogh, who presented the case to the grand jury, blames attorneys representing the county for advising the police department to withhold certain information about Torres. Eventually the details were turned over and the grand jury empaneled.

    “I'm very comfortable where we are now,” he said. “My only regret was I wasn't able to do my job about a year and a half ago when I should have been able to do it.”

    Silence about the Geer case led to protests. A special commission, of which Stewart is a member, was created to examine and revamp police policies.

    “It certainly can give some validation to a life that was lost,” he said. “If that comes from this and it can save some other family some grief, John would be proud to be part of it.”

    Torres will be in court at 10 a.m. Wednesday to face the second-degree murder charge against him.