8 "Molly" Cases Per Month Concerns Fairfax County Parents

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Northern Virginia Bureau reporter David Culver reports the new figures released by Fairfax County and Loudoun County police on the growing use of "Molly" in the area. (Published Friday, Sep 13, 2013)

    The number of cases of the drug “Molly” investigated in Fairfax County is causing concern among parents.

    Since January 2012, Fairfax County Police Organized Crime and Narcotics Unit detectives investigated 168 cases involving MDMA, also known as Molly, a purer form of ecstasy. That’s eight cases per month, and police have confiscated 16.67 pounds of the drug – about 3,000 pills.

    "I'm surprised that the numbers are that high," Fairfax County parent Kathryn Collins.

    When Marie Sloan first heard about Molly she immediately turned to her teenage daughter .

    "She had heard about it and then she found an article in ‘Teen Vogue’ that she showed me,” Sloan said. “'Here, Mom, this is what you were asking about.'"

    The death of University of Virginia student Shelley Goldsmith is believed to be connected to the drug. She collapsed and died in a D.C. club late last month. One of several recent tragedies along the East Coast.

    "This is very dangerous - not only illegal - but very dangerous, potentially, to their health and has caused deaths in other parts of the country as well as most likely around this region," said Lucy Caldwell of Fairfax County police.

    She noted the dangers of mixing Molly with other drugs.

    Parents are concerned that their children could become victims.

    "I would just be more concerned that people were given it and not really knowing what it is and what could happen," Collins said.

    "I think it points to the importance of all parents knowing what their children are doing, who they're with, where they are, as much as it's humanly possible to know that, and staying on top of those things," Sloan said.

    She also wants to see school resource officers tracking the drug and talking to students.

    "I think it's really important that the SROs have relationships with the kids in the schools, so they're not just seen as someone to avoid," she said.

    Police Chief Edwin Roessler said that's part of his plan.

    "It's going to involve a lot of education and prevention within the school systems, which we are doing, to hopefully stop people from using it," Roessler said.

    He promised his department is in touch with what's going on.

    "Our detectives are connected to various task forces, and they operate well together, so yes, we are sharing the information," he said.

    Loudoun County police reported 14 Molly cases in 2012 and 12 so far in 2013.

    News4 also asked authorities in Prince William and Arlington counties but is still waiting for those numbers.

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