Local Leads: 03/04/10

News you need to know

View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    Getty Images

    The following stories have been hand-selected by the Assignment Desk at News4:
     

    ALEXANDRIA TAKING LAND
    What happens when the Alexandria Sanitation Authority determines it needs property but the owners won’t sell? The answer to that question is an eminent domain case now making its way through the Alexandria Circuit Court. A jury will determine the actual price even though the public authority has already seized the property. (Alexandria Gazette Packet)

    YOUNG WOMAN SHOT
    The body found Tuesday in North Stafford belonged to a young woman who was shot to death, police say today, and they're seeking the public's help identifying her.  "Somebody may have seen or heard something related to this case," Sheriff Charles Jett said in a prepared statement. "We are hoping a tip will lead to the identity of this victim as well as the individual or individuals who are responsible for her death."  The woman's body was discovered in the woods near the Interstate 95 southbound ramp off of State Route 610 on Tuesday afternoon. (Fredericksburg.com)

    BEER ROBBERS WANTED
    Apparently, these men wanted a beer. An employee at the CVS Pharmacy at 4338 Dale Boulevard in Dale City said three men walked into the store about 1:50 a.m. Wednesday, picked up multiple cases of beer and then tried to leave. (Insidenova.com)

    FOLLOW THE MUD TRAIL...
    Prince William County police responded to Hylton High School located at 14051 Spriggs Road in Woodbridge to investigate a suspicious vehicle on school property. It was reported to the police that a driver was doing donuts on the soccer field at the high school.  When the officers arrived, the driver had left the scene. However, another officer was on his way to an unrelated call when he observed large amounts of mud on the roadway and followed the trail. (Gainesville Times)

    YOU TAKE THE HOUSE... PLEASE
    Thanks to plummeting property values, divorcing couples now find themselves fighting for the right not to keep the house.
    The crippled real estate market has turned once-valuable assets into huge financial burdens. Homes bought at or near the peak of the housing market in 2005-2006 have lost tens of thousands of dollars in value in just a few years, forcing many discordant couples to keep a painful reminder of a failed relationshi (Washington Examiner)