Local Leads: 3/26/10

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    The following stories have been hand-selected by the Assignment Desk at News4:

    LANDLORDS INVESTIGATED
    The D.C. government body charged with issuing property permits and enforcing building and safety codes has identified and begun investigating 86 landlords in the Georgetown area believed to be operating with invalid or nonexistent business licenses.  Although the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs routinely investigates landlords on an individual basis, the most recent wave of inspections is landlords based in an area primarily populated by college students living off campus in leased residences. According to the College Board, 30 percent of Georgetown students live in housing not owned by the university. “This effort, I think, is the first in a while that has this large number [of violations],” said DCRA Communications Director Mike Rupert. “I think in the end, it’s definitely raising awareness.” (The Hoya)

    BARRY TAX WOES
    The Internal Revenue Service claims that D.C. Council member Marion Barry owes $15,000 in unpaid taxes for 2005 through 2008, so it has issued a lien to try to collect the money, according to records filed with the city. (Washington Post)

    DC RENT, EXPENSIVE
    The Washington area is the sixth most expensive rental market in the country, according to a new study.  San Francisco was the most expensive metro area in which to rent, at $1,760, and Wheeling, W.Va., was the least expensive, at $588, according to a report by the Center for Housing Policy.  In the Washington region, the fair market rent reached about $1,500 in 2009.
    (Examiner)

    SOUTHERN MARYLAND, WEALTHIEST
    The recession was kind to Southern Maryland, at least relatively speaking. Two of the region's three counties remain among the 25 wealthiest in the country, according to Forbes magazine. Charles and Calvert counties, the fourth and third wealthiest in the state, respectively, both have almost a third of residents age 25 or older with at least a bachelor's degree, according to the article. (The Independent)