Local Leads: 12/14/09

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    The following stories have been hand-selected by the Assignment Desk at News4:

    DUNNING MURDER, SIX YEARS LATER
    In the six years since the murder of Nancy Dunning, one image has served as an enduring symbol for the mystery surrounding the killing. Now police say the focus of their investigation has changed, and they are no longer looking for the mystery man in the photo.  (Alexandria Gazette Packet)

    BUSY SHIPPING DAY
    It's the busiest day of the year for the U.S. Postal Service and the shipping companies.  On the busiest mailing day of the year, the post office expects to process 839 million pieces of mail. (wtop.com)

    DC POLICE RUN OVER MAN
    The family of an 18-year-old northeast Washington man said that D.C. police officers hit the man with their marked cruiser Saturday night and left the scene without calling for help but returned a short time later. Dominic Turner suffered broken ribs, internal bleeding and a back injury. He was struck about 8:30 p.m. Saturday after officers had chased him and a group of friends near 20th and Newton streets NE, family members said.  A witness said the men were running from police when the cruiser struck Turner, knocking him to the ground in an alley. (Washington Post)

    GAS TAX INCREASE?
    With a $4 billion deficit looming over the Virginia General Assembly, the need for lawmakers to raise taxes may be inevitable.  One McLean-based organization that advocates for more funding for long-neglected transportation projects says a potential solution would be to increase the gas tax.  With a report due out next month saying the current gas tax barely covers the funding needed for road maintenance, Bob Chase, president of the Northern Virginia Transportation Alliance, says raising the gas tax should be one of the ideas on the table when the General Assembly convenes in a month.  (wtop.com)

    PAY AS YOU GO TRASH PICKUP
    Ellis Burruss takes his trash out only every five weeks. He fills his recycling container every week, and sees little need to make use of his one 32-gallon trash can. The Brunswick resident pays the same as others who throw away much more, something he asserts is not fair. "Consequently, when I see people putting out bag after bag of trash, I realize I'm subsidizing their waste," Burruss said. "So I don't like that."  Burruss is in favor of state legislation proposed by the Frederick County Commissioners this year. They are asking for authority to establish a pay-as-you-throw system, in which residents are charged based on how much they throw away. (Frederick News Post)