Judge Scolds Kwame Brown for Violating Court Requirements

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Former D.C. Council Chairman Kwame Brown was ordered to appear in court today after missing three weekly phone calls with the court. He is now under a curfew and other rules. Brown is supposed to be sentenced next month on felony bank fraud. News4's Tom Sherwood reports.

    In U.S. District Court today, Judge Richard Leon scolded former D.C. Council Chairman Kwame Brown, broadly hinting that Brown could be jailed if he doesn’t follow his pre-sentencing requirements to stay in touch with the court until his sentencing in November.

    Brown, once a rising star in District politics, pleaded guilty last summer to a federal felony for altering a federal document to falsify his income by $50,000 in order to buy a pleasure boat. Brown resigned as council chairman.

    Under his pre-sentencing agreement, Brown agreed to cooperate with authorities on any further investigations (which he has done), agreed to seek permission if he went out of town (which he has done), and agreed to check in once a week by telephone with the court offices (which he has not done.)

    Court officials said in court today that on three separate occasions Brown failed to telephone as required.

    The judge today revised his order and said that for the next five weeks until his sentence is imposed, Brown will have to personally show up in court offices once a week. He also placed Brown on a curfew from 11 p.m. at night until 6:30 a.m. in the morning.

    Brown finally got to apologize and promised to follow the judge’s instructions. But the judge fired back, "Your apology is a little late in the game … what’s your excuse?"

    Sources close to Brown tell News4 that the former chairman still believes that he’s being unfairly and harshly treated for the crime he committed and is having trouble coming to grips with his serious legal situation.

    Below are some of the quotes from Judge Leon.

    “You’re 5 weeks away from sentencing. This is not the way to position yourself.”

    “You must be extremely careful. You don’t want to know what the next step is.”

    “Don’t be back here until the day of sentencing. This is pretty simple stuff.”

    --U.S. District Court Judge Richard Leon