'Homeless at Howard' Student Gets Help from Alumna - NBC4 Washington

'Homeless at Howard' Student Gets Help from Alumna

Student says he was kicked out of dorm after letting students in

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    Howard University sophomore Jawanza Ingram says the school is leaving him homeless by kicking him out of the housing system for breaking university rules. News4's Shomari Stone reports. (Published Friday, Nov. 6, 2015)

    A Howard University student who admits to breaking dorm security rules says the school left him homeless by expelling him from the housing system.

    Jawanza Ingram, 18, was evicted from his dorm on Tuesday, after he says he let some fellow Howard students into his dorm through an emergency door to celebrate his suitemate's birthday. He turned to social media for help from his fellow students, who made #HomelessAtHoward a trending hashtag in the District.

    A photo he posted to his Twitter account shows him wheeling a suitcase down a hallway, lugging a duffle bag and wearing a backpack.

    Late Saturday, News4 learned that someone had stepped up to help Ingram: a Howard graduate had a home that she planned to rent out, but instead she will let Ingram live there rent-free for the rest of the year, according to HBCU Pride Nation, a group that was helping Ingram find housing.

    He'll move in next week.

    But the rescue follows a tough week for the sophomore marketing major.

    Ingram told News4 he let his friends in through a side door about 11:45 p.m. Nov. 2. They left without incident, he said. The following day, he received a letter informing him he would need to move out of the dorm and would be ineligible for student housing through the rest of the school year, until July 2016.

    He said he apologized but school officials refused to let him move back onto campus.

    "I'm from Miami. I don't have family in the DMV area. Where am I gonna go?" Ingram said, sitting on a bench, surrounded by his belongings.

    Ingram said he argued that had no disciplinary record at the school, which he attends on a full scholarship that covers the cost of housing.

    "They shrugged their shoulders at me. They had nothing to say," Ingram said.

    Howard vice president Bill Whitman Jr. stood by the university's decision, which he said stems from a policy designed to keep students safe.

    "Maintaining a safe and secure campus is a top priority at Howard University," he said in a statement. "Any violation of Howard University policies is taken seriously, investigated and appropriate action is taken to mitigate risks."