Downpours May Lead to Local Flooding

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Storm Team 4 Meteorologist Veronica Johnson has your Friday evening weather forecast.

    After a sunny Friday morning, be prepared for rain this evening.

    Storm Team4 meteorologist Tom Kierein said there is a threat of heavy downpours from 2 p.m. to 9 p.m., with a chance of some localized flooding.

    D.C. activated its hyperthermia alert before 1:30 p.m. as the temperature reached 92 and the heat index 97. The heat index has since risen to 100.

    Storm Team4 meteorologist Amelia Segel said heavy winds may accompany these isolated thunderstorms. Not everyone in the region are getting them, but for those who are, the storms have potential to be severe, and several warnings were issued Friday afternoon and evening.

    Reagan National Airport has already said some flights may experience ground stops between 1 p.m. and 11 p.m. due to thunderstorms.

    Friday was the hottest day in the D.C. area since July 21.

    The one bright side: Kierein said this weekend is shaping up to be much less humid and “great for outdoor activities.”

    While some humidity will linger this weekend, it will not reach Friday's highs. The highs on Saturday and Sunday are expected to be 89 and 88 degrees respectively, but those temperatures will be more manageable with less humidity.

    Kierein stressed that none of the flooding that D.C. may experience should compare to storms in Nashville, Tenn., last night that accumulated almost eight inches of rain in a very short amount of time.

    According to The Tennessean's Heidi Hall, yesterday's floods affected at least 100 homes and businesses in Nashville and an unconfirmed number in Wilson County.

    The floods struck so sporadically that while some houses lost everything, others only a mile away were almost entirely unaffected by flooding.

    A similar flood occured in Nashville in 2010 that devastated Nashville homes. 

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