Fredericksburg Semi-Pro Football Player Shot Saturday

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    NEWSLETTERS

    A beloved mentor, semi-pro football player and youth coach was killed outside a nightclub where he was moonlighting as a bouncer. News4's Jackie Bensen reports.

    Marcellus Greene was known in Fredericksburg as a loving father, a youth football coach and a mentor -- and known for his career of almost two decades as a semi-pro football player in the U.S., Canada and overseas.

    Early Saturday morning, Greene's final block most likely saved another life.

    Greene, 45, was shot and killed while working as a security guard at Q-Ball, a pool hall and nightclub in Fredericksburg.

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    Greene was 6'5" and weighed 260 lbs., and he took the guard job to help support his 17-year-old son. That night, Greene knew that there had been a fight in the parking lot.

    So Greene offered to walk out in front of a female patron who was leaving, to make sure she would be safe. He apparently did not know the fight was continuing -- and that it now involved as many as 300 people in the parking lot. He also didn't know that at least one person was still shooting.

    "The music was so loud, I don't think he heard the shots," said Stephen Greene, the victim's brother.

    On Sunday, Spotsylvania Sheriff's Deputies arrested 26 year-old Lavon Antonio Chew for the shooting. Chew is charged with brandishing a weapon, and firing a weapon from a car.
    Investigators say additional charges are pending, and they're looking for at least two other suspects.

    As News4's Jackie Bensen reports, even the arrest showed how many people respected Greene, who was known as "Bull." The family of the suspect knew Greene, said Greene's brother.

    "I called his mother," said Stephen Greene. "And I said, 'Please, ask your son to turn himself in.' She told me she was going to find her son, and he definitely turned himself in.'"

    Friends and former teammates hope to come together to remember the life of Marcellus Greene sometime this week.

    "Now, I know he left a legacy behind for the young ones," Greene's mother, Shirley, said of the young people he coached. "Someday, maybe they will look back [and say,] 'I want to do what Bull did.'"