Capitol Bomb Plot Suspect Waives Preliminary, Detention Hearings

El Khalifi held pending indictment

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    Dana Verkouteren
    Amine El Khalifi, accused of plotting to suicide bomb Washington, at his initial hearing Friday afternoon.

    A Virginia man charged with plotting a suicide bombing inside the U.S. Capitol waived his rights to preliminary and detention hearings Wednesday.

    Amine El Khalifi, of Alexandria, Va., was arrested Friday and charged with attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction. On Wednesday afternoon, he was ordered held pending indictment.

    In December, the 29-year-old discussed plans to attack an Alexandria office building and a synagogue with an undercover FBI operative he thought was a member of al-Qaida, authorities said.

    Later, El Khalifi allegedly volunteered to wear a suicide vest and to kill himself in a martyrdom operation at the Capitol, according to authorities. His arrest came after a lengthy FBI investigation.

    El Khalifi went as far as to don the suicide vest provided to him by the undercover operatives before he was arrested, according to an FBI affidavit. The suicide vest turned out to be inert, and a gun that had been provided to him to shoot his way past security guards also was inoperative. The public was never in danger, officials said.

    According to court papers, El Khalifi told his supposed co-conspirators that he would be happy if he could kill 30 people in the attack.

    It is not entirely clear how El Khalifi came to the attention of authorities. Court papers state only that a confidential source reported El Khalifi to the FBI in January 2011 after he allegedly met with others at an Arlington residence and told others that the group needed to be ready for war, and that he agreed with others who believed the war on terror to be a war on Muslims. One individual at that meeting produced what appeared to be an AK-47 rifle.

    El Khalifi is a native of Morocco who has been living illegally in the U.S. for more than a decade, according to court documents.