<![CDATA[NBC4 Washington - Local News]]>Copyright 2016http://www.nbcwashington.com/news/local http://media.nbcnewyork.com/designimages/WASH+NBC4+BLUE.png NBC4 Washington http://www.nbcwashington.comen-usSun, 25 Sep 2016 17:08:51 -0400Sun, 25 Sep 2016 17:08:51 -0400NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[Timelapse: 52 Months of Museum Construction (in 106 Seconds)]]> Sun, 25 Sep 2016 15:58:47 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/earthcam-timelapse.jpg

After 100 years in the making and 52 months of construction, the Smithsonian's long-awaited National Museum of African American History and Culture opened its doors on the National Mall on Saturday.

Above, you can watch EarthCam.net's timelapse video of the process, boiled down to just 106 seconds.



Photo Credit: EarthCam
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Police: Uber Driver's SUV Stolen During Passenger Pick-Up]]> Sun, 25 Sep 2016 15:00:05 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/160*138/uber122.JPG

A Uber driver was robbed of his vehicle early Sunday morning in northeast Washington, according to the Metropolitan Police Department.

Detectives said a driver for Uber stopped in the 300 block of 9th Street, Northeast, shortly after 5 a.m. Sunday to pick up a passenger. When he got out of the car to help with luggage, police said he was approached by three masked people, who said, “Give me the money.”

Police said the driver ran into the nearest house. They said the three people stole the vehicle, a black, four-door, 2013 Chevrolet Suburban SUV, with Virginia license plates H525778.

]]>
<![CDATA[Oprah, Will Smith Share African-American Journey in Poems]]> Sun, 25 Sep 2016 14:31:10 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/20160924+Oprah+Will+Smith+Thumb.jpg Oprah Winfrey and Will Smith share the work of African-American poets during the dedication of the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[What Visitors Can Expect at African American History Museum]]> Sun, 25 Sep 2016 12:33:40 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/WRC_0000000016208620_1200x675_772795459583.jpg Dr. Greg Carr, associate professor and chair of the department of Afro-American Studies at Howard University, discusses the the significance of the museum and what can people expect when they walk in.]]> <![CDATA['Life-Changing': Visitors React to African American Museum]]> Sun, 25 Sep 2016 15:32:03 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/2016-09-25_1235.jpg

"Phenomenal." "Hopeful." "Exhilarating." Visitors were enthralled by their trips through the new National Museum of African American History and Culture on its opening day, describing the experience as inspiring, cathartic and phenomenal -- a word that came up again and again.

New groups of eager visitors are lining up outside the newest Smithsonian on Sunday, sharing their thoughts on what they're most looking forward to seeing now that Washington, D.C.'s highly anticipated black history museum has opened its doors after more than 100 years in the making.

"I think just being able to look at all the African American history in one set location, looking at Prince's jacket, Chuck Berry's Cadillac; I'm just excited about the whole thing," said Jennifer Kirby, who traveled with her family from Atlanta.

"I'm just going to say Emmett Till's original casket, because I lived through that era," said visitor Vivian Favors.

With thousands of items occupying 85,000 square feet of exhibition space, the new Smithsonian is chronicling the complex relationship between the United States and a people it once enslaved, and telling the story of those who worked to make the necessary changes to bring the country to where it is today.

Alexis Lennon, of Takoma Park, said she thought the museum did an "amazing job of telling our story."

"It was life-changing for me to finally have a place that embodies African American culture," she said Sunday.

Lifelong D.C resident Denise Evans said she jumped at the opportunity to visit the museum when a friend who couldn't make it offered her a ticket Sunday morning.

Evans, 49, said the museum was "sort of heartbreaking," but also interesting and uplifting. 

"Unfortunately so many things are repeating itself and so it was a little bit heartbreaking to see that as far as we've come we are beginning to repeat those same patterns of discrimination," Evans said. "But I think because we can see the path from it then we can sort of being ourselves out of it again." 

Her favorite exhibit highlighted African American fashion. 

"Just really being able to see that we have our own style, that we can own who we are and that we really do have an impact on much of what the whole does... so much of that has been quieted, and so seeing it on display it's like, 'OK, right, we are pretty cool and we are creative and we are gifted,'" she said.

The museum is offering extended hours for its grand opening weekend.

Sunday, the museum will stay open from 7 a.m. to midnight, but passes were snapped up almost as soon as they became available. Although admission is free, the museum is using a timed pass system to control crowds and alleviate wait times.  

Despite the lengthy lines both outside and inside the museum, visitors said the timed entry pass system is efficient, keeping wait times down.

However, anyone heading toward the museum this weekend should be prepared for large crowds and heightened security.

Freedom Sounds Festival Open to Public

The museum's outdoor music festival is open to the public on the Washington Monument grounds, with no tickets required. The festival, Freedom Sounds, is celebrating the talent and creativity of African-American artists, with jazz, R&B, gospel and hip-hop artists throughout the weekend.

The Roots, Living Colour and Public Enemy headlined Saturday night. Performances continue throughout the day Sunday, with another main-stage concert scheduled for 6 to 9 p.m. A surprise special guest is slated to perform.

After 'Incredible' Experience, Museum Goers Plan to Return

Lennon and Andres Rossy toured the museum for more than three hours Sunday, but said they would need much more time to see everything inside. 

"You definitely can't do it all in one day," said Rossy, of Takoma Park. "So we'll be back, but I had a great time."

Margaret Baxter and her husband drove up from their home in Durham, North Carolina to visit the museum with Margaret's 71-year-old grandmother.

As a fan of history, Baxter said she enjoyed the exhibits on slavery and segregation in America.

"It would probably take you two to three days to see every single thing, but it's so well put together," she said. "It's incredible."

Her grandmother, D.C. resident Marthena Baxter, said she enjoyed seeing the exhibits highlighting "entertainers from back when," like Chuck Berry, Barry White and James Brown.

Marthena Baxter said she plans on returning to the museum after crowds die down to "really take everything in."

 "The whole place was amazing, absolutely amazing," she said. "I will be back."

Saturday's Dedication Ceremony: "By Understanding this Story, It Binds Us Together"

Centuries of struggles and strife, decades of planning and pain, and years of hoping for a place that African-American history can call home culminated Saturday morning as President Barack Obama officially dedicated the museum.

Obama opened the museum Saturday with the ringing of the historic Freedom Bell from the First Baptist Church in Williamsburg, Virginia, which was organized in 1776 by slaves.

Obama said the new national museum will help to tell a richer and fuller story of the country.

"It helps us better understand the lives, yes, of a president, but also the slave. The industrialist, but also the worker. The teacher or the cook, alongside the story of the statesman," he said. "By understanding this story, it binds us together and reaffirms we are all Americans."

He continued his message of the inclusion of African Americans in American history, calling it "an act of patriotism to understand where we've been."

"We're not a burden on America or a stain on America or an object of shame and pity for America. We are America. And that's what this museum explains," Obama said. "Hopefully, this museum makes us talk to each other and listen to each other and see each other."

The dedication featured speeches by Obama, civil rights leader U.S. Rep. John Lewis, former President George W. Bush and the museum's founding director, Lonnie Bunch. It also featured rousing musical tributes with a local flair, including Howard University's "Showtime" marching band and an a capella presentation by a choir from D.C.'s Duke Ellington School for the Arts.

The museum, the 19th and newest of the Smithsonians, opened to the public following the dedication ceremony.

"It's a historic event," said Leslie Howard, who traveled from New Orleans to attend the dedication. "And the fact that we have our first black president to dedicate it shows you how God works."

"We want to make sure we reinforce the commitment to preserve African-American history," said Glen Yonkers, Jr., a member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, which was founded at Howard University in Washington. Members marched to the mall for the dedication Saturday.

"Our fraternity was built for African-American men to have a place to share our history and stories," said fraternity brother Jude Collins. "This was the only place to be today."

Seeing the dedication was a family event for many; Alicia Frayer came from Charleston with her husband and three daughters to attend. "I'm inspired by history," she said. "It's a major part of our history, and the fact that our history and culture are here for everyone to see is so important." 

Many celebrities came to the museum's dedication as well, including Oprah Winfrey, who has donated more then $20 million to the museum.

The museum tweeted a video of Octavia Spencer and Janelle Monae arriving. Robert De Niro, Angela Bassett, Will Smith and Patti LaBelle were among those presenting during the dedication.

Lexie Schapitl contributed to this report.


For more information about the museum, check NBC Washington's full coverage here.



Photo Credit: Lexie Schapitl, NBC Washington
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Man Shot, Killed in NE DC Early Sunday]]> Sun, 25 Sep 2016 10:23:24 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/216*120/2016-09-25_0838.png

Metropolitan police said one man was shot and killed early Sunday morning in northeast Washington.

Police said they found a man in the 400 block of Riggs Road, Northeast, around 2:45 a.m. The man was suffering from a gunshot wound and was pronounced dead at the scene.

Detectives are still investigating the case. The victim has been identifed as Marcellus Thomas, 22, of northeast Washington.



Photo Credit: NBC4 Washington ]]>
<![CDATA[Softball Tournament Honors Hannah Graham in Fairfax County]]> Sat, 24 Sep 2016 23:59:59 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/Hannah+Graham1.jpg The memory of murdered University of Virginia student Hannah Graham was kept alive Saturday at a softball tournament in Fairfax County. It was held at Graham's former high school. News4's Darcy Spencer reports on what Graham's father said to the young women at the tournament.]]> <![CDATA['We Are America': New African American History Museum Opens]]> Sat, 24 Sep 2016 16:54:57 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/20160924+Obama+on+Stage+Thumb.jpg

Bells rang out throughout Washington, D.C. Saturday as the Smithsonian's highly anticipated National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C., opened after more than 100 years in the making.

Centuries of struggles and strife, decades of planning and pain, and years of hoping for a place that African-American history can call home culminated as President Barack Obama officially dedicated the museum Saturday morning.

The president opened the museum with the ringing of the historic Freedom Bell from the First Baptist Church in Williamsburg, Virginia, which was organized in 1776 by slaves.

Obama said the new national museum will help to tell a richer and fuller story of the country.

"It helps us better understand the lives, yes, of a president, but also the slave. The industrialist, but also the worker. The teacher or the cook, alongside the story of the statesman," he said. "By understanding this story, it binds us together and reaffirms we are all Americans."

He continued his message of the inclusion of African Americans in American history, calling it "an act of patriotism to understand where we've been."

"We're not a burden on America or a stain on America or an object of shame and pity for America. We are America. And that's what this museum explains," Obama said. "Hopefully, this museum makes us talk to each other and listen to each other and see each other."

With thousands of items occupying 85,000 square feet of exhibition space, the new Smithsonian will chronicle the complex relationship between the United States and a people it once enslaved, and tell the story of those who worked to make the necessary changes to bring the country to where it is today.

The dedication featured speeches by Obama, civil rights leader U.S. Rep. John Lewis, former President George W. Bush and the museum's founding director, Lonnie Bunch. It also featured rousing musical tributes with a local flair, including Howard University's "Showtime" marching band and an a capella presentation by a choir from D.C.'s Duke Ellington School for the Arts.

The museum, the 19th and newest of the Smithsonians, opened to the public following the dedication ceremony.

"It's a historic event," said Leslie Howard, who traveled from New Orleans to attend the dedication. "And the fact that we have our first black president to dedicate it shows you how God works."

"We want to make sure we reinforce the commitment to preserve African-American history," said Glen Yonkers, Jr., a member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, which was founded at Howard University in Washington. Members marched to the mall for the dedication Saturday.

"Our fraternity was built for African-American men to have a place to share our history and stories," said fraternity brother Jude Collins. "This was the only place to be today."

Seeing the dedication was a family event for many; Alicia Frayer came from Charleston with her husband and three daughters to attend. "I'm inspired by history," she said. "It's a major part of our history, and the fact that our history and culture are here for everyone to see is so important." 

Many celebrities came to the museum's dedication as well, including Oprah Winfrey, who has donated more then $20 million to the museum.

The museum tweeted a video of Octavia Spencer and Janelle Monae arriving. Robert De Niro, Angela Bassett, Will Smith and Patti LaBelle were among those presenting during the dedication.

Many of those present shared their personal connection to the museum's story, including D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton.

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser spoke before the ceremony, honoring its opening and using the opportunity to call for statehood for the nation's capital, where residents do not have voting representation in Congress. "While we are proud to host this museum ... we know it will show how far Washington has to go," Bowser said.

The museum is offering extended hours for the grand opening weekend, from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Saturday and 7 a.m. to midnight Sunday, but timed entry passes are no longer available. While entry is free, like at other Smithsonian facilities, the museum is instituting a timed pass system to control crowds and alleviate wait times. 

Those who didn't score tickets had the option to watch the museum's dedication ceremony in large-screen viewing areas at the Washington Monument grounds, or livestream the ceremony on the museum's website.

A free three-day festival celebrating the talent and creativity of African-American artists is also taking place on the Washington Monument grounds. The Freedom Sounds festival features jazz, R&B, gospel and hip-hop artists throughout the weekend. The Roots, Living Colour and Public Enemy headlined the festival Saturday night, and a surprise special guest is slated to perform Sunday. 

Anyone heading toward the museum this weekend should be prepared for large crowds and heightened security.

The push for the museum began in 1915 with African-American Civil War veterans looking for a way to commemorate America's black experience. Former President George W. Bush signed the law authorizing the construction in 2003.

Lewis, who co-sponsored legislation authorizing its construction, said the bronze-colored museum "is more than a building, it is a dream come true."

For more information about the museum, check NBC Washington's full coverage here.



Photo Credit: Smithsonian
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Freedom Bell from Va. Opens African American Museum]]> Sat, 24 Sep 2016 13:26:32 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/180*120/178286185.jpg

The Freedom Bell that rang to open the National Museum of African American History and Culture traveled from Williamsburg, Virginia, but its story began nearly 250 years ago.

A group of free and enslaved African-Americans met secretly near the Virginia city and formed what is known as the First Baptist Church. It is believe to be the first Baptist church organized by and entirely for African-Americans.

The bell was cast in 1886 after funds were raised by women at the church. Although silent through much of the civil rights era, it rang in early 2016 for the first time in years to mark the 240th anniversary of both the Declaration of Independence and the Frist Baptist Church of Williamsburg.

"This is first and foremost about the First Baptist Church of Williamsburg, our community, and a larger message we hope to share with the nation," said Mitchell Reiss, president of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, in a February NBC News story. "Colonial Williamsburg was built by enslaved African-Americans, and it was rebuilt in the 1920s and '30s, largely by African-American workers. We believe that this is a moment in time where we can provide some of our assistance to the church to make a statement that we think will be heard across the country."

President Barack Obama, along with first lady Michelle Obama, rang the bell at the end of the dedication ceremony, opening the new Smithsonian museum, located on the National Mall, to the public.

The bell will be displayed at the museum until the beginning of October. It will return to Williamsburg in time for the official anniversary celebration of the church.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[PHOTOS: African-American History Museum Opening]]> Sat, 24 Sep 2016 15:58:19 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/20160924+Children+Embrace.jpg Celebrities, politicians and civil rights leaders joined thousands on the National Mall this weekend for a three-day festival event to celebrate the newest Smithsonian Museum — the National Museum of African American History and Culture. ]]> <![CDATA[Fire, Smoke at Metro Center: Service Back to Normal]]> Sat, 24 Sep 2016 11:14:16 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/20160923+Metro+Track+Fire+John+Grant.jpg

Metro train service between McPherson Square and Federal Triangle stations on the Orange and Blue lines has resumed after fire and smoke forced delays inside the Metro Center station during the Friday afternoon rush.

Shortly after 5 p.m Friday., there was a report of an arcing insulator on the lower level, according to Metro Transit police and a Metro spokesperson. Service was suspended on the Orange, Blue and Silver lines.

A witness told News4 the fire started on the Silver Line track before a train arrived. A spokeswoman for Metro said at about 5:40 p.m. Friday, the fire has been put out and D.C. Fire and EMS has left the station.

On Saturday morning, the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority said the incident was cleared and rail service was restored to the Metro Center Station. No injuries were reported.

Riders shared photos on social media of fire on the tracks, smoke emerging from tunnels and passengers standing on crowded platforms.

Riders shared photos on social media of fire on the tracks, smoke emerging from tunnels and passengers standing on crowded platforms.

Riders should keep in mind the SafeTrack program is still in effect for the Orange line from Vienna to West Falls Church stations.



Photo Credit: John Grant
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Prince George's County Exec Gets Tattoo to Support Wife With Dementia]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 20:51:56 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/WRC_0000000016202538_1200x675_772253251884.jpg The wife of Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker is fighting dementia. Baker and his kids are supporting her anyway they can, and as News4’s Kristin Wright shows us, that includes using a symbol as a permanent tribute.]]> <![CDATA[Festival Celebrates Opening of National African American Museum]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 19:30:29 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/African+Drums.jpg A festival celebrating the grand opening of the new National Museum of African American History and Culture began Friday. News4's Derrick Ward reports.]]> <![CDATA[First Day of In-Person Absentee Voting in Fairfax County]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 19:16:39 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/Fairfax+County+Voting.jpg Some Virginia residents have already voted in person and a record number of absentee ballots were sent out to voters in Fairfax County, Virginia. Northern Virginia Bureau Chief Julie Carey reports.]]> <![CDATA[Falls Church Business Expands Annual Fundraiser]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 19:05:29 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/WRC_0000000016201390_1200x675_772157507919.jpg The Locker Room Sports Bar & Grill in Falls Church is expanding its annual fundraiser. There are several popular and highly valued items.]]> <![CDATA[Here's Where to Watch Monday's Presidential Debate ]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 18:54:21 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/clinton-trump-split-serious.jpg

Presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton will come face-to-face Monday night for the first presidential debate.

You don't want to miss the conversation moderated by NBC's Lester Holt, so why not make it fun?

Head to these D.C. venues on debate night for food, drink and politics:

Open City DC
Open City’s Woodley Park location will host debate bingo starting at 9 p.m. $5 wings will be served, and the bingo grand prize is a $50 gift card. There will also be a happy hour drafts.

Busboys and Poets (14th & V)
Not only will Busboys and Poets host a watch party, but there will be a panel discussion following a viewing called "Debunking the Presidential Debate." Panelists Bill Ayers, Jared Ball, Medea Benjamin, and Fatemah Keshavarz will discuss the oddities of this election cycle.

Ventnor Sports Cafe
Come enjoy the debate, bingo and pub fare at this restaurant which take a break from sports and trivia for the night. According to their Facebook page, representatives from various breweries will give out prizes and giveaways during the event.

Bar Pilar
Sip a “Split the Party” cocktail as you watch the debate and enjoy debate bingo. While you’re at it, submit an original cocktail recipe devoted to your favorite candidate, complete with a catchy name, for the chance to have it featured at the bar.

Boqueria
Watch the debate and enjoy unlimited tapas with Boqueria’s “Big Talk, Small Plates” event. For $45 a person, you can enjoy every presidential (and vice presidential) debate this season while eating Spanish cuisine. Space is limited, so make a reservation in advance.

Pennsylvania 6
You can enjoy extended happy hour every presidential (and vice presidential) debate at Pennsylvania 6, which will extend its happy hour from 9 to 10:30 p.m on debate nights. Watch the debate while eating $1 Chesapeake Bay oysters and $7 red and white wines.

Lincoln
Where better to watch the presidential debate than in a restaurant named after a Founding Father? Enjoy election-themed cocktails and food, such as the Trump Steak Bites or the Clinton BBQ Sliders, which are $5 apiece. Lincoln will host parties for each debate this season.



Photo Credit: Getty/NBC Universal]]>
<![CDATA[Photos: Boat Blocks Middle Lanes of I-495]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 23:35:58 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/Boat+Beltway.jpg

A boat in Virginia ran into some rough seas Friday evening -- on the Capitol Beltway.

Photos on social media show a boat that appeared to have fallen off a truck into the middle lane on Interstate 495 before the Franconia Springfield exit about 7 p.m.

A Virginia Department of Transportation crew responded to the scene.

News4 has reached out to VDOT for more information, but has not yet received a response.



Photo Credit: @afcl6
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[PGPD Launches 'Chief on the Go' Program]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 18:28:28 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/WRC_0000000016200729_1200x675_772116035822.jpg Amid unrest surrounding deadly police shootings across country, the Prince George's County Police Department -- once subject to federal oversight for its own allegations of abuse -- is seeking to boost relationships with the community. Police Chief Hank Stawinski spoke with residents and played with children in Brandywine on Friday. News4's Tracee Wilkins reports.]]> <![CDATA[Man Sentenced to 18 Months for Recording Md. Gang Rape]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 19:02:38 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/092316+cecil+burroughs.jpg

A known gang member could have been sentenced to 13 years in prison for his role in the gang rape of a 16-year-old girl in Montgomery County, Maryland, but a judge sentenced him on Thursday to just 18 months.

Cecil Burrows, 23, was convicted in 2013 for his role in the rape. Burrows encouraged three men to rape the blacked-out teen in his home in Olney and recorded the attack, prosecutors said.

Sentencing guidelines call for Burrows to serve a minimum of seven years and maximum of 13 years, but Judge Sharon Burrell gave him a year-and-a-half-long term.

The sentence left one neighbor of Burrows angry.

"I'm really outraged that the judge only gave him 18 months. That's a crime in itself," she said, asking that her name be withheld.

Burrows agreed to a plea deal under which he would serve a maximum of 13 years. He was on probation for theft and assault at the time of the rape.

Burrell said in court Thursday that the other men who attacked the teen are serving as long as 15 years in prison.

The judge was not available to speak with News4, a representative said.

The investigation into the gang rape began after Lil R gang leader Andres Cortez bragged about the rape to a coworker and showed him video of the attack, police said. The coworker told his boss, who told police.

After Burrows serves his sentence, he will be deported to India.

The attack devastated the victim, Assistant State’s Attorney Patrick Mays told The Washington Post.

“She got a life sentence,” he said. “She’ll never be the same.”



Photo Credit: Montgomery County Police Department]]>
<![CDATA[Woman Dies After Falling From Mattress Atop Moving Vehicle]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 16:45:38 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/shutterstock_149847923.jpg

A Virginia woman died after falling from an unsecured mattress on top of a van early Friday morning, Prince William County Police said.

Sidney Zelaya Gonzalez, 20, was riding atop a mattress that had been placed on the roof of a 2006 Chevrolet Express Van in Haymarket, police said.

The driver, a 41-year-old Culpeper woman, was headed north when Gonzalez and the mattress fell from the van. It happened on Waverly Farm Drive just south of Bent Grass Drive. Police responded about 6:40 a.m. Friday.

Gonzalez, also of Culpeper, was pronounced dead at the scene.

Police do not think alcohol or speeding lead to the crash.

Charges are pending for the driver.



Photo Credit: Shutterstock / Sergey Nivens]]>
<![CDATA[Student Mumps Case Confirmed at University of Maryland]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 16:15:05 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/doctor-health-generic-1200-02.jpg

One University of Maryland student has been diagnosed with the mumps and two other cases are suspected, officials say.

All three cases of the contagious disease involve students and are believed to be linked to each other, university health officials said Friday in an email to students and faculty.

"This is not cause for alarm," the email said.

University of Maryland students are required to be immunized against the disease, but the vaccination is not 100 percent effective, university health officials said.

Common symptoms of mumps include fever, headache, muscle aches and swollen salivary glands, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Complications can cause inflammation of the brain and deafness.

Mumps can be transmitted through saliva and spread through kissing, coughing and sharing utensils.

The number of reported mumps cases hit a low of 229 in 2012 but has risen in recent years. The 2016 total as of mid-August was 1,786, according to the CDC.

Stay with News4 for more details on this developing story.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Va. Man Gets 10 Years for Trying to Arrange Sex With Girl]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 16:55:55 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/gavel15.jpg

A Virginia man caught by an undercover agent who was pretending to advertise a 10-year-old girl for sex was sentenced Friday to 10 years in prison.

Justin Frank Clark, 28, pleaded guilty in June to attempting to coerce and entice a minor, according to a press release from the Eastern District of Virginia's U.S. Attorney's Office.

Clark communicated via email from April to May with the agent, and arranged to travel from Stafford County, Virginia, to Washington, D.C., for sex, prosecutors said. Clark also sent pornographic videos involving children, they said.

On Friday, U.S. District Judge Claude M. Hilton sentenced Clark to 10 years in prison along with 10 years of supervised release. He will have to register as a sex offender upon release.



Photo Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto]]>
<![CDATA[All Clear After Suspicious Vehicle Investigated Near Capitol]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 16:42:26 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/20160923+Suspicious+Package2.jpg

Police found nothing suspicious after using a bomb squad robot to investigate a suspicious vehicle on the 300 block of Independence Avenue SW, south of the National Mall.

Several roads were closed for the investigation. Drivers saw heavy traffic nearby.

Independence Avenue is closed between Washington Avenue and 4th Street. Maryland Avenue is closed between Garfield Circle and Independence Avenue.

First Street is closed between Independence Avenue and Peace Circle, and southbound 3rd Street is closed at Jefferson Drive. 

Video from the scene appears to show a bomb squad robot positioned near a minivan, which had all its doors and trunk open.

U.S. Capitol Police and the D.C. police bomb squad assisted in the investigation.

Stay with News4 for more details on this developing story.



Photo Credit: NBC Washington]]>
<![CDATA[Ex-Police Officer Accused of Supporting ISIS Sues Sheriff]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 21:21:32 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/Nicholas+Young+Look+N.jpg

A former Metro Transit Police officer accused of trying to support ISIS terror “could see himself dying soon” behind bars, according to a lawsuit he’s filed against the Alexandria Sheriff, which oversees the jail in which the officer is being held.

Nicholas Young, who was arrested in August on a federal charge of attempting to support a terror group, has lost 7 to 10 pounds since his arrest and is suffering an “acute deterioration in mental health” while in custody, according to his suit.

Young is being held in the Alexandria jail as he awaits further court proceedings. In his lawsuit, Young said he is being held in solitary confinement in an 8-foot wide cell for 22 hours each day. The solitude is contributing to a breakdown in his health, Young said in his suit. Young said the confinement also could impact his legal case. In his lawsuit, attorneys said solitary confinement “could coerce Mr. Young into pleading guilty to charges to which may have meritorious defenses.”

Through his suit, Young is seeking a transfer from solitary confinement to the jail’s general population.

According to the lawsuit, “(Young) recently bit off a portion of a tooth while grinding his teeth in a paroxysm of stress, for which (deputies) informed Mr. Young he could not expect to receive medical assistance for several days.” His suit also said Young has notified his attorney he “could see himself dying soon” in custody. It said Young “is apparently the only detainee currently held in solitary confinement not charged with, and without a history of, violence.”

Young, of Fairfax, is accused of attempting to provide material support to a designated foreign terrorist organization. He was arrested at Metro headquarters in early August. It's the first time a law enforcement officer has been accused of aiding the terrorist organization. Young, 36, met on 20 separate occasions with an FBI informant whom he believed was a man being radicalized, prosecutors said. He sent the man 22 digital gift card codes to be used with mobile messaging accounts that ISIS uses in recruiting, according to prosecutors.

Young served with the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority Police department for 13 years. In recent years, he was working his job while under investigation and surveillance, according to multiple reports and his lawsuit.

According to the lawsuit, Young’s attorneys received an explanation from the sheriff about the use of solitary confinement. The suit said, “On September 15 and 16, 2016 undersigned counsel received a phone call, and follow up email, from Sheriff (Dana) Lawhome, which clarified the following: Mr. Young is being held in 22-hour-a-day isolation 'for his own safety'; notwithstanding the deleterious effects of constant isolation on Mr. Young's health and well-being, Mr. Young will not be moved to the general population unless and until the press coverage of Mr. Young's case diminishes.”

“The conditions of Mr. Young’s detainment are for the U.S. Marshals and the Alexandria Detention Center to decide," said Joshua Stueve, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Virginia. "We take no position on the matter.”

"The Alexandria Detention Center does not have solitary confinement," the sheriff's office said in a statement. "Mr. Young has been placed in the appropriate housing unit based on the recommendation of our experienced classification staff. In this case, he is in administrative segregation, meaning he does not have contact with other inmates, which is for his own protection. Sheriff Lawhorne has monitored Mr. Young’s situation since the day he arrived and he has corresponded with Mr. Young’s family and his attorney on numerous occasions."

Young’s civil suit has been assigned to an Alexandria-based judge.

The next court proceeding in his criminal case is scheduled for November. Young faces a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison if convicted.



Photo Credit: Courtesy of Nicholas Young's family]]>
<![CDATA['Bath Crashers' Star Has Tips for Fixing Up Your Bathroom]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 13:34:50 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/WRC_0000000016196320_1200x675_771893827960.jpg The host of the DIY Network television show "Bath Crashers" has tips for spiffing up your own bathroom. News4's Barbara Harrison speaks with Matt Muenster. "Plan your work, work your plan," he said. He'll be at the Capital Home Show all weekend.]]> <![CDATA[DC Food Truck in Running for Breakfast Sandwich Award]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 13:17:20 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/WRC_0000000016196335_1200x675_771897411729.jpg The D.C. food truck Dirty South Deli is in the running for winning a national breakfast sandwich award. Chef Jacob Hunter shows News4's Eun Yang his sandwich with sausage, a fried egg, homemade pimento cheese and more on an English muffin. ]]> <![CDATA[High School Student Dies After Shooting in Md. Apt.]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 21:04:16 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/Diego+Gomez-Martinez.jpg

A high school student died Friday morning after he was shot inside a Prince George's County apartment Thursday night, Bladensburg Police said.

Diego Gomez-Martinez, of Bladensburg, was with a group of teens playing video games at an apartment in the 4200 block of 58th Avenue when he was shot.

Witnesses said four to eight people were inside the apartment and others were outside. A teenager witnesses said they didn't know came out of the apartment about 8 p.m. then went back inside. Then the witnesses heard a gunshot and saw the same teenager running out of the building moments later. 

"We got a shirt and we pressed down on his bullet hole 'til the feds got here," said Malik Hebrin, a friend of the victim.

Gomez-Martinez was taken to a hospital, where he died.

Police are investigating to determine what led to the shooting. It's possible it was accidental.

A Prince George's County Public Schools spokesman confirmed the victim was a sophomore at Bladensburg High School.

"He was looking forward to a life of college and career and exploring what different experiences the world had in store for him," Principal Aisha Mahoney said. "It's just sad."

Bladensburg Police originally investigated the shooting. The death investigation has since been turned over to the Prince George's County Police Department.

Anyone with information is asked to call Prince George's County Police at 301-772-4925. Callers wishing to remain anonymous may call Crime Solvers at 1-866-411-TIPS (8477), text "PGPD" plus their message to CRIMES (274637), or submit a tip online at www.pgpolice.org.

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<![CDATA[African American Museum: 100 Years in the Making]]> Thu, 22 Sep 2016 16:51:05 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/NC_aahmuseum0920_1920x1080.jpg

The new member of the Smithsonian family, angular and intricate, extends towards the sky, nestled between the Washington Monument and the National Mall.

The minds behind the National Museum of African American History and Culture made deliberate decisions in the structure of the massive building that will be open to the public on Sept. 24.

Exterior ironwork honors African American metalworkers and a covered porch celebrates the tradition of sitting outside and connecting with one another.

But just as elements of the museum’s design represent a rich history of African American perseverance, there is a story behind how the museum made it to the National Mall.

In fact, the idea to create an African American museum was first conceived more than 100 years ago.The path to constructing a museum memorializing the experiences of African Americans has been long and full of setbacks.

In total, the 400,000 square foot museum cost $540 million, took 11 years of fundraising and four years of construction before it became a reality.



Photo Credit: NBC News
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<![CDATA[Children's Book Author Speaks on Eve of Book Festival]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 12:53:02 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/092316+childrens+books.jpg Author Juana Medina discusses her children's books with News4's Barbara Harrison. On Saturday, she will appear on the Children's Stage of the Library of Congress National Book Festival.

Photo Credit: NBC Washington]]>
<![CDATA[ Va. Boy Who Inspired Social Media Campaign Dies]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 21:13:30 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/josh+hardy1.jpg

The Fredericksburg, Virginia, boy whose family sparked a social media movement to provide him access to an experimental drug has died. 

Josh Hardy, 10, died Thursday at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, according to The Free Lance-Star.

Josh's family first made headlines in March 2014 after he caught a rare viral infection following a bone marrow transplant to treat cancer.

His family begged the pharmaceutical company Chimerix to give Josh Brincidofovir, an experimental drug they heard may help treat his illness, but the company refused.

Fearing that Brincidofovir was the only thing that had a chance of saving their beloved son -- and knowing they had just days to do it, Josh's parents turned to social media and ignited the #SaveJosh campaign.

Thousands of people joined the campaign, and after just a little more than a week, Chimerix announced that it would allow Josh to receive the medication. And after just three doses, Josh began to recover.

But in January 2016, Josh's health began to decline. 

According to The Free Lance-Star, he was having trouble breathing and spent most of this year in the hospital. 

A day before his death, Josh's family posted a message on the Save Josh Facebook page, thanking God for what would be their last day with him. 

"Thank you for the many miracles we have witnessed," the post read. "It's hard to believe You will not deliver him again."

Hours later, a photo of a the hashtag #SaveJosh was replaced with the photo of a black ribbon -- a symbol of remembrance or mourning.

A final post reads, "We will do what is hard. We will achieve what is great. We will do what is required. We will find a cure."

“I just instantly broke down crying because he’s the most amazing, amazing little guy and he would never, ever, ever give up,” said his kindergarten teacher, Christine Montgomery.

Teacher Tony Wishard remembered Josh's sense of humor. The boy sent him a signed baseball and told him to hold onto it, it'll be worth something someday. Wishard now has it framed.

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<![CDATA[Road Closures for Museum of African American History Opening]]> Sat, 24 Sep 2016 09:48:23 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/museum+road+closures.jpg

Road closures begin Friday night for the grand opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture. One thing is clear: If you're going to go, it's best to be on foot.

Major traffic disruptions are expected to begin at 7 p.m. Friday, D.C. police said.

The following closures will last from 7 p.m. Friday through about 10 p.m. Sunday:

  • 15th Street from Constitution Avenue N.W. to Maine Avenue S.W.
  • Madison Drive NW from Seventh Street N.W. to 15th Street N.W.
  • Jefferson Drive SW from Seventh Street S.W. to 15th Street S.W.
The following changes will be in effect Saturday:
  • Constitution Avenue will be closed from 12th to 18th Street NW in both directions
    • All eastbound traffic will be diverted to northbound 18th Street NW from Constitution Avenue NW
    • All westbound traffic will be diverted to northbound 12th Street NW from Constitution Avenue NW
    • All southbound traffic on 17th Street NW will be diverted to westbound Constitution Avenue NW
  • The 12th Street tunnel will remain open during this time.
  • 15th Street will be closed from Pennsylvania Avenue NW to Maine Avenue SW
  • 14th Street will be closed from Pennsylvania Avenue NW to Independence Avenue SW
  • Access to the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center will be available via 13 1/2 Street NW
  • Madison Drive NW will be closed from 7th to 15th Street NW
  • Jefferson Drive SW will be closed from 7th to 15th Street SW

The following closures will be in effect from 6 a.m. Sunday to 10 p.m. Sunday: 

  • Constitution Avenue will be closed from 14th to 18th Street NW in both directions
  • 15th Street from Pennsylvania Avenue NW to Maine Avenue SW
    • All eastbound traffic will be diverted to northbound 18th Street NW from Constitution Avenue NW
    • All southbound traffic on 17th Street NW will be diverted to westbound Constitution Avenue NW

In addition, D.C. police warn there will be no public or bus parking near the museum for the dedication ceremony.

Drivers in the area may encounter delays and should consider alternative routes if possible, officials said.

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<![CDATA[Hungry? The Sweet Home Café Is Serving Up Culture]]> Thu, 22 Sep 2016 18:27:52 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/2016-09-23_0850.jpg Go inside the National Museum of African American History and Culture’s Sweet Home Café with Executive Chef Jerome Grant.

Photo Credit: NBC Washington]]>
<![CDATA[Smithsonian's Newest Museum Gets Ready to Welcome the Public]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 06:32:44 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/180*120/sept+14+getty+powell.jpg The grand opening of the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture is just one day away. News4's Molette Green has more on how the city will celebrate.

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[App Takes User Through New Museum Floor by Floor]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 06:27:55 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/216*120/2016-09-23_0627.png If you can't visit the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture this weekend, you can still experience all it has to offer. The Smithsonian is launching a mobile app for the museum's opening. The app takes you through the museum floor by floor and details many of the key artifacts already on display. News4's Aaron Gilchrist spoke with the app's developer Aaron Saunders. ]]> <![CDATA[3 Howard University Students Robbed at Gunpoint]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 06:22:10 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/howard_university1.jpg

Four men robbed three Howard University students at gunpoint just outside the campus, school officials said Thursday. 

The students were on the corner of Georgia Avenue and Fairmont Street NW at 9:50 p.m. Thursday when they were approached by four men. 

Police say the men robbed the students of two wallets, two iPhones and a watch. The suspects then ran from the scnee. 

No injuries were reported. 

Anyone with information about this incident should call the school's Department of Public Safety at 202-806-1100 or 911. 

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<![CDATA[2 Men Assaulted With Machete in Burke Home Invasions]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 13:04:04 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/burke+home+invasion.jpg

Two men were attacked with a machete in two separate home invasions in Burke, Virginia, Friday morning. 

The first incident happened just before 2 a.m. Friday in the 6300 block of Fenestra Court. Police say four people wearing masks forced their way into the townhome and assaulted the 28-year-old victim with a machete.

A short time later, the same four suspects forced their way into a home in the 6300 block of Birch Leaf Court, where they assaulted a 62-year-old man with the same weapon.

The two scenes are about a block and a half apart. 

Police say the victims are acquaintances and were targeted. Both men suffered non-life-threatening injuries. 

The suspects fled the area in a waiting vehicle. 

Police say there's no threat to the public at this time. 

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<![CDATA[Descendants of Famous Slave-Born Artist See His Work]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 05:32:36 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/Dave+the+Potter.JPG

A local family found out they are the descendants of a man who was born a slave and created now-famous works of art -- one of which will go on display at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in D.C.

Daisy Whitner said it all started with a phone call she received from a genealogist in the spring.

"I said, 'I'm on my feet now. You know a lot about my grandparents.' Who are you? You know, and she said, 'Well, I know a lot about your family.'"

The genealogist invited Whitner and her family to Dave Day, a festival in South Carolina that honors a famous African American artist who had been born a slave.

Known as Dave the Potter, Dave challenged anti-slave literacy laws by learning to read and write and he inscribed poems on the pots he made. Some of the surviving pots have sold for more than $100,000. 

It was at the festival that the family learned they are direct descendants of Dave.

Back home, another member of the family, Wanda Holmes, arranged for them to view one of Dave's pots that is displayed at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History.

It was a powerful moment for them as they saw the work of a man who perservered after his family had been sold away from him. 

"You read books about slavery, but it was somebody else. But when it's your relation, then it becomes personal. It touches you here and you can't stop crying because you can feel their pain," said John Williams, relative of Dave the Potter.

"Then you also feel the pride of him being able to accomplish, under those circumstances and you wonder if you could ever do that or if you could be that strong," said relative Pauline Williams Baker.

Dave's pot is moving to the National Museum of African American History and Culture and will be there on Saturday for the museum's grand opening.



Photo Credit: Wanda Holmes]]>
<![CDATA[Sean 'Diddy' Combs Pledges $1M to Howard University]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 10:43:39 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/p+diddy+feuerherd.jpg

Sean "Diddy" Combs will give $1 million to his alma mater, Howard University, he announced Thursday.

The historically black university helped the musician and entrepreneur get his start, he said.

“I was blessed to receive a great education from Howard University – one of the best schools in the world – and it helped to fuel my success in business and life," he said in a statement. "This scholarship will make it possible for the next generation of leaders to pursue their dreams and achieve greatness."

The funds will support The Sean Combs Scholarship Fund, which will award scholarships starting in fall 2017 to undergraduate business majors.

In addition to receiving financial aid, scholarship recipients will get summer internships at Bad Boy Entertainment or Revolt Media & TV and have a mentor from Combs Enterprises, the star said in his statement.



Photo Credit: Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP]]>
<![CDATA[Nation's Oldest Park Ranger Celebrates 95th Birthday]]> Fri, 23 Sep 2016 06:48:37 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/Betty+Soskin.jpg

If given the chance, not many people might choose to work on their 95th birthday — but National Park Service Ranger Betty Soskin sees her work as an opportunity to share her wisdom.

Soskin, the oldest park ranger for the country, is in Washington, D.C., to help celebrate the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

"I know how my generation met the threat of its day," Soskin told a group of local students on Thursday.

Soskin met with the local students to share her experience growing up during World War II and what is was like for women and minorities like herself during the civil rights era.

"We have no nostalgia for that period. That is a painful period of rejection," Soskin told News4.

Sharing her story is Soskin's full-time job back in her home state of California, where she works at the Rosie the Riveter/WWII Home Front National Historical Park in Richmond.

She didn't become a park ranger until she was 85 years old.

Soskin said touring the new African American museum brought memories of the days during her childhood when she traveled with relatives from California to Louisiana.

"When we got to El Paso, Texas, we would have to go into the Jim Crow car," Soskin said.

Recently, she made national headlines after someone broke into her home and brutally attacked her, stealing the presidential coin she received after lighting the national Christmas tree last December. In July, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell gave Soskin a replacement coin during a surprise ceremony.

Jewell asked Soskin to go with her to the grand opening of the African American museum on Saturday.

As Soskin says in her blog, "this 'lil ole lady ranger will be rubbing shoulders with the likes of Laura Bush, Oprah Winfrey, Quincy Jones, Willie Brown, General Colin Powell, etc., and we may all be wondering just how on earth she ever got on the A-List!"

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<![CDATA[Man Stabbed in Chinatown in Broad Daylight]]> Thu, 22 Sep 2016 16:42:39 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/Chinatown+Stabbing.jpg

A man was stabbed at the center of Chinatown in the middle of the day Thursday, police said.

The man was stabbed in the arm about noon near 7th and H streets NW. Police said two people are in custody.

Investigators said the victim made his way toward the sidewalk, where a good Samaritan helped him until medics arrived.

"He obviously could not control the bleeding. So, I just grabbed his arm, tried to make a tourniquet. Huge wound... you could put your hand in there if you wanted to," said Henry Francis, the man who helped the victim.

The victim's injuries are not life-threatening, police say.

Police blocked off 7th Street NW between H and G streets for about three hours while they investigated. An entrance to the Chinatown-Gallery Place Metro station was also closed during the investigation.



Photo Credit: NBCWashington]]>
<![CDATA[Suspects Wanted for Stealing Tires and Rims in Arlington]]> Thu, 22 Sep 2016 18:58:22 -0400 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/Honda+Accord.jpg

Bold thieves are ripping off tires and rims from vehicles in Arlington, police say.

In just minutes, the suspects strip the vehicles of all four tires and leave them sitting on concrete blocks.

Arlington County police said three vehicles' tires have been stolen this month.

On Sept. 8, thieves stole the tires and rims off of a Honda Accord parked in the 1600 block of South Joyce Street. Police were called about the car about 7:15 a.m.

"There was a car, a newer Honda and it had no tires. It seemed kind of odd because there was not jack, nothing. Just blocks," said Brett Warnebold, who saw the car. "You knew something was up because it was sitting kind of funny."

Just around the corner, the suspects did the same to another Honda Accord parked at the Horizon House Condominium parking garage at 1300 Army Navy Drive. Police arrived to that scene about 7:30 a.m.

Surveillance video shows the two thieves pull up to the site of the second robbery in what appears to be a light colored four-door sedan. The suspects go back and forth holding tools and taking the tires and shoving them in the backseat of their car.

Then, one of them gets the final tire and puts it right in his lap in the passenger seat before the other suspect drives away.

Police described the first suspect as a male wearing a hooded jacket, pants and gloves. The second suspect is described as a medium to dark skinned male with a beard and skull cap.

Management at Horizon House Condominium warned its residents about the theft.

Police said the suspects took the tires and rims off of a Porche SUV early Tuesday morning at a parking garage in the 900 block of South 15th Street.

Officers found the SUV on plastic crates. The suspects repositioned a security camera in the garage and broke the passenger window to the SUV, police said.

Police believe the suspects are selling the tires.

To prevent your wheels from being stolen, police said drivers should park at an angle so it is harder for thieves to take the tires off and to use wheel locks.

Police also advise not to let people follow behind you into garages with restricted access.



Photo Credit: Brett Warnebold]]>