Find an H1N1 Vaccination Clinic Near You

Shortage stalls some health centers

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
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    Swine flu vaccine is available in the United States, but manufacturers are having a hard time keeping up with demand.

    The amount of the H1N1 vaccine has been limited due to manufacturing problems, but there are clinics available, especially for those at high risk of influenza-related complications, like children and pregnant women.

    If you're looking for a swine flu vaccination clinic near you, here's where to get information:

    County Changes Plans Over Vaccine Shortage

    [DC] County Changes Plans Over Vaccine Shortage
    A major shortage of the swine flu vaccine is causing some jurisdictions to cancel clinics.

    The federal government also has information on where to find H1N1 flu vaccine clinics at Flu.gov, as well as a H1N1 Flu Self-Evaluation test -- which, as the site mentions, should not be a substitute for for evaluation and treatment by a healthcare professional.

    Or use Google Maps to find flu and swine flu vaccination clinics.

    In addition, there will be one vaccine clinic in each of the District's wards every week over the next month. The clinics will rotate between schools on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays.

    The H1N1 vaccine will be available in both the injection and nasal spray forms at each clinic. 

    In Virginia, health officials had been expecting about 120,000 vaccine shots by the end of the month, but now say only 10,000 doses will be delivered, The Washington Post reported. In Maryland, health officials said they expect to be short on the vaccine by about 45 percent

    The vaccine is still being produced by about five companies, but health officials say they are overwhelmed by demand and distribution is slow -- and that, in turn, is limiting the number of people who can get the flu vaccine right now.

    Health officials on Tuesday released data on lab-confirmed swine hospitalizations and deaths from 27 states, the AP reported. Nationwide, 19 children have died from the swine flu strain and more than two-thirds of the total deaths were in adults ages 25 to 64.

    More than half of all hospitalizations were people 24 and younger, health officials said.