<![CDATA[NBC4 Washington - TV, movies, music and celebrity news]]> Copyright 2016 http://www.nbcwashington.com/entertainment/entertainment-news http://media.nbcbayarea.com/designimages/WASH+NBC4+BLUE.png NBC4 Washington http://www.nbcwashington.com en-us Sat, 06 Feb 2016 15:58:41 -0500 Sat, 06 Feb 2016 15:58:41 -0500 NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[Iggy Azalea Talks New Album, Trendsetting]]> Sat, 06 Feb 2016 10:49:40 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/214*120/AP922502109304.jpg

As Iggy Azalea readies the release of her sophomore album, the rapper says she's feeling more self-assured and less worried about being or sounding cool.

"I think I'm more confident, and I think I have more belief in what I think is cool rather than worrying about what other people are going to like," Azalea said in an interview Friday.

"I think I have more belief in myself in being a trendsetter, which all artists should. So I hope to maybe move the dial a little bit more than I did last time," she added.

The 25-year-old made the comments before she performed at a Sports Illustrated pre-Super Bowl Party in San Francisco — a city she said she loves visiting. Azalea said she wasn't attending Sunday's Super Bowl in Santa Clara, California, but she's happy to watch Beyoncé, Bruno Mars and Coldplay perform during the halftime show.

"I have to go home and work, but I will be watching them on television. I'm excited to watch them at home," the pink-haired performer said.

She signed autographs and took photos with fans outside of the 1015 Folsom nightclub, and inside she shook hands with concertgoers in the loud crowd while also performing songs like "Fancy" and "Black Widow."

Azalea said her new album will be released "this half of the year." It won't include as many guest artists as her Grammy-nominated debut, "The New Classic," she said.

"Less features than last time. I went a bit feature crazy," she said of the 2014 album, which included songs co-starring Jennifer Hudson, mentor T.I., reggae artist Mavado and pop singers Rita Ora and Charli XCX.

"I'm hoping people will see my growth, being able to hold my own on a song without needing somebody else's companionship," she added. "But I still will do some features because I love that, too."



Photo Credit: Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP]]>
<![CDATA['Late Night' Hot Topics 'YaBurnt']]> Sat, 06 Feb 2016 07:32:58 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/214*120/Final-Late-Night-Burnt-.jpg Seth Meyers deals with the hottest topics of the week]]> <![CDATA['Tonight Show' Rebel Wilson Plays up the Single Life]]> Sat, 06 Feb 2016 05:53:56 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/Single-Life-Fallon-.jpg Jimmy Fallon and Rebel Wilson play up the Single Life.]]> <![CDATA['Tonight Show' Thank You Notes]]> Sat, 06 Feb 2016 05:54:25 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/214*120/Fallon-Bush-Newton-Thank-You-Notes-AM.jpg Jimmy Fallon writes his weekly Thank You Notes .]]> <![CDATA[Late at Night on NBC]]> Fri, 28 Aug 2015 11:00:30 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/AP24762024125.jpg

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Super Bowl Ads: Willem Dafoe Is Not Himself]]> Fri, 05 Feb 2016 15:34:34 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/Snickers+Willem+Dafoe.jpg

With only a couple of days to go until Super Bowl 50 kicks off in Santa Clara, CA, big name advertisers are already hyping the rollout of the ads they hope will become event classics.

Ad space during the biggest game of the NFL season comes at a premium price – a 30-second Super Bowl 50 ad spot is selling for as much as $5 million, according to Fortune. That's a lot of money to push beers, cars and potato chips, but when the NFL championship airs on Feb. 7 on CBS, advertisers can expect to have their product in front of over 1 million consumers (last year's game drew 114 million viewers).  

Promoting a product during the Super Bowl also comes with great expectations from audiences wanting to be wowed each and every year. Ad campaign directors attempt to go bigger and better, adding more wow factors, comedy, or embracing emotion to root their brand in the minds of Americans.

Take a look at the the ads below and check back regularly for all the Super Bowl spots rolled out in the lead-up to the big game. 

Willem Dafoe does his best Marilyn Monroe in Snickers ad entry for Sunday's big game. It's a continuation of their "You're not you when you're hungry" campaign. 

Squarespace is back for Super Bowl 50 with the aid of comedy duo Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele, who not only star in the ad but will also be providing live commentary throughout the game. 

Cuteness is a big draw on game day amidst all the hits, completions and blocks. So Mountain Dew has gone one – or should that be two? – better by combinging three things that often win the Super Bowl ad game: puppies, monkeys and babies. The creepy/cute Frankenstein-like creation is on hand to push the new Kickstart range which combines Dew, juice and caffeine. 

Automaker Audi is back for its eighth Super Bowl appearance with a spot featuring the 2017 Audi R8 V10 Plus. To the score of David Bowie's "Starman," a retired astronaut gets his groove back thanks to his son and the 205 mph Audi. 

No More, the public awareness campaign designed to inform and engage people to end domestic violence and sexual assault will debut their latest PSA "Text Talk" during the third quarter. 

Returning to the big game for the fourth consecutive year, Toyota is showcasing the latest version of its popular Prius hybrid by placing an everyman actor in the car to the soundtrack of the original song "Heck on Wheels." 

Super Bowl entertainment sponsor Pepsi and singer Janelle Monae are hoping their latest spot will deliver the "Joy of Dance" to audiences ahead of the Coldplay/Beyonce halftime extravaganza. 

Pantene teamed up with some NFL players for its "Strong is Beautiful" ad campaign to show women and girls "shine by helping to build their confidence." The videos feature the athletes figuring out what the playbook is on styling their daughters' hair. In one, Pittsburgh Steelers running back DeAngelo Williams wants to know, "Why do they make these barrettes so complicated for guys?" as he tries to create twisted pigtails for his daughter, Rhiya.

Thanks to the all new Genesis sedan, overprotective papa Kevin Hart manages to keep tabs on the whereabouts of his teenage daughter as she attempts to on Hyundai's "First Date." 

Steven Tyler is on deck for Skittles, and the Aerosmith frontman helps the candy brand push their "taste the rainbow" slogan with the aid of a high-pitched portrait of himself. 

With Amy Schumer and Seth Rogen already on board to push Bud Light (see below), Anheuser-Busch upped the Super Bowl celebrity quotient with the release of their new Budweiser ad tagged #GiveADamn. Helen Mirren stars in the drink driving PSA as herself, a "notoriously frank and uncensored British lady" who makes it very clear how dumb you must be to drive drunk. 

Drake revisted his dance moves from the video of his song "Hotline Bling" in the new T-Mobile Super Bowl spot. He also agrees to change the lyrics in order to make the hit sound more like a cell phone contract. 

Honda is back at Super Bowl 50 after sitting out the ad extravaganza in 2015. Focusing on the 2017 Ridgeline pickup truck, the Japanese carmaker enlists the help of some singing sheep to perform Queen's 1976 hit "Somebody to Love." 

According to Hyundai, a drive in their new 2017 Elantra is like taking a trip to Ryanville – that's a place where all the men look like Ryan Reynolds. 

Acura is back for the first time since 2012 with the launch of the brand new NSX supercar. 

Another carmaker ready to celebrate 50 years of the Super Bowl is Mini, helped out by a few familiar faces in their #DefyLabels spot. 

Scott Baio takes a trip to space to push Avocados from Mexico in an out of this world ad spot. 

Heinz is on cute overload with their spot for Ketchup featuring a stampede of weiner dogs, wearing hot dog costumes, no less. 

Who knows what lurks in the walk-in closet? Christopher Walken does, and is, in the Kia Optima ad. But why is he there? Check out the full ad spot:  

Online retailing giant Amazon will make their first appearance at the annual ad bowl, thanks to a little help from Alec Baldwin and Dan Marino.  

To celebrate 50 years of the big game, the NFL has released a music video as their spot featuring generations of Super Bowl babies singing a version of Seal's "Kiss from a Rose." 

Also employing the power of celebrity is Apartments.com, enlisting the talents of Lil Wayne, Jeff Goldblum and "George Washington" in a spot titled "MovinOnUp." Check out the tease we guarantee will leave you more confused than ever about what's going on, followed by the full ad spot.  

Also is the realm of random team-ups are the Marmot teasers. The outdoor clothing purveyor is making its ad debut at the Super Bowl and introducing audiences to their new marmot mascot.  

While chocolate may not be the first thing that comes to mind when thinking about game day, Butterfinger (parent company Mars) is back for Super Bowl 50 and teasing their spot in advance.

Electronic game franchise Pokémon is celebrating its 20th anniversary and has created a Super Bowl ad that'll run at the beginning of the game's third quarter. 

First to tease this year's campaigns was Anheuser-Busch (the event's exclusive beer sponsor for the 28th straight year). Shock Top readies to make its Super Bowl debut with a little help from comedian T.J. Miller.

Elsewhere, Amy Schumer and Seth Rogen are hoping Americans will come together under the Bud Light Party. 

Also making a Super Bowl debut is LG Electronics with a little help from producer Ridley Scott and actor Liam Neeson. 

A year after its Super Bowl debut, website development company Wix is back with a "Kung Fu Panda 3" tie-in spot produced by DreamWorks Animation. 



Photo Credit: YouTube
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<![CDATA[Samantha Bee Season]]> Fri, 05 Feb 2016 13:34:22 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-504216848.jpg

The segment could have been straight out of "The Daily Show": Samantha Bee, fake journalist, pokes at the truth with pointed humor as she spotlights the very real disgrace of women U.S. veterans left to use prosthesis made for men.

"Here's you mistake," she told her interview subject, a woman who was given a prosthetic foot intended for a man. "You went to the VA thinking your problem was a missing foot when really your problem was a missing penis."

The bit offered vintage Samantha Bee, who helped define "The Daily Show" as an often blunt, sardonic source of news-driven satire during her 12-year run, the longest – and one of the strongest – of any correspondent.

The prosthesis clip is being used to promote her new weekly program, "Full Frontal with Samantha Bee," which debuts at 10:30 p.m. Monday on TBS. The show marks Bee’s welcome return to the air while addressing TV's own disgrace of a late night comedy landscape devoid of women hosts since Chelsea Handler’s E! show ended nearly 18 months ago.

Bee's new gig also represents the latest offspring of the Jon Stewart-era "Daily Show," which helped launch news parody programs from Stephen Colbert, Larry Wilmore and John Oliver, whose “Last Week Tonight” returns for a third season on HBO Feb. 14. After Stewart stepped down in August, he turned over the Comedy Central show to Trevor Noah, a smart young South African comic, who is doing a fine job so far.

The Canadian-born Bee left "The Daily Show" in April as a well-practiced expert in the art of deadpan, while proving equally adept at flashing TV-reporter-like looks of empathy before swooping in with punch lines that exposed hypocrisies. Perhaps her greatest moment came at the 2008 Republican National Convention when she used the pregnancy of Bristol Palin to lure conservatives into sounding nearly liberal when discussing reproductive rights ("There’s a word I’m looking for... I think it rhymes with 'voice?'" Bee prodded).

Clips touting "Full Frontal" offer more examples of the "Daily Show"-style correspondent approach as well as showing Bee in the host’s role, giving her take on the Iowa caucuses ("State color: white people," she said of the Buckeye State).

The recent barrage of promos – which include an elaborate "Star Wars" spoof – suggests that Bee’s aiming to produce social media friendly material that will attract some of "The Daily Show" crowd, along with new fans.

 

Jere Hester is Director of News Products and Projects at the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism. He is also the author of "Raising a Beatle Baby: How John, Paul, George and Ringo Helped us Come Together as a Family." Follow him on Twitter.


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<![CDATA['Shades of Blue' Preview: Episode 5]]> Fri, 05 Feb 2016 08:52:41 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/ShadesBlue-Ep5.jpg What will Harlee and Tess intercept that leads them to discover Wozniak's secret affair? Who is Wozniak sleeping with inside the company and who is planning to blackmail Wozniak with this information? Plus, what is it that Harlee suspects Stahl of planting in her bedroom and what will she do about it? Take a sneak peek at next week’s explosive show below.]]> <![CDATA['Tonight' Puppies Predict Broncos Win Super Bowl]]> Fri, 05 Feb 2016 08:09:26 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/PUPPIES_Screen-Shot-2016-02-05-at-2.08.17-AM.jpg

Take it from these prescient puppies: the Denver Broncos are going to win the Super Bowl. 

The “Tonight Show” has a clutch of puppies known as the "Predicting Puppies" with the ability to see into the Sunday’s game. Instead of a crystal ball there are two aluminum bowls filled with dog food. And each bears the name of the competing teams, the Denver Broncos and the Carolina Panthers.
Whichever team’s bowl gains the largest ball of puppies is surely meant to win.

“This works every year,” host Jimmy Fallon said as he introduced Brad Kennedy, Mary Kennedy, Ted Mooney and several other pups.

Fallon will often summon the all-seeing-eye dogs for major sports events. In the past, the puppies failed to see that the Broncos would lose in 2013 to the Baltimore Ravens. But this year’s a sure thing.

“That was a landslide right there,” Fallon said after the dogs chose the Broncos as this years Super Bowl 50 winner.



Photo Credit: NBCUniversel, Inc. ]]>
<![CDATA[Megyn Kelly Talks Trump Boycott on 'Tonight Show' ]]> Fri, 05 Feb 2016 01:45:39 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/KELLY_AP_828085981256.jpg

Megyn Kelly explained on "The Tonight Show” that she was just doing her job as a journalist during the Republican debate she moderated that featured a clash with Donald Trump.

“We never thought anyone would react to the questions that way,” she said to host Jimmy Fallon. “He got a tough question but they all got tough questions.”

Kelly, who hosts the “Kelly File” on Fox News, appeared on the “Tonight Show” on Thursday night where she described the “surreal six months” after Trump accused her of being biased against him because of her line of questions during an Aug. 6 debate last year.

During that debate, she asked Trump about his treatment of women.

“You've called women you don't like ‘fat pigs,’ ‘dogs,’ '’slobs’ and ‘disgusting animals’,” she said to Trump. “Does that sound to you like the temperament of a man we should elect as president? And how will you answer the charge from Hillary Clinton, who is likely to be the Democratic nominee, that you are part of the war on women?"

Kelly explained to Fallon Thursday night that the point of a debate is to ask “tough questions.”

“All those guys got it right it in the kisser. But that’s what they have to do,” she said. “They want George Washington’s job”

She continued, “I’m a member of the press and that’s what I do, press.”

Fallon praised Kelly for not bowing to Trump’s boycott of the Jan. 28 debate and asked her if Trump would be attending the upcoming Republican debate on March 3.

“He hasn’t committed,” she said and then went on to note that Trump has inspired many on the right.

“He’s electrified the Republican debates,” she said. “He’s introduced a lot of issues in this election that Republicans wanted to talk about.”



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Colin Jost Thinks Larry David Has Helped Sanders]]> Fri, 05 Feb 2016 03:44:17 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/DAVID_Screen-Shot-2016-02-05-at-2.10.54-AM.jpg 'SNL' member Colin Jost explains to host Seth Meyers has enjoyed Larry David’s presence on the set of ‘SNL” and, by Jost’s estimation of David “as a likable person,” Bernie Sanders gets a bump in the polls from David’s impression of Sanders. Who would characterize David as likable?]]> <![CDATA[ 'Late Night': Colin Jost's Childhood Videos]]> Fri, 05 Feb 2016 03:40:55 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/EMBARASS_Screen-Shot-2016-02-05-at-2.20.21-AM.jpg Seth Meyers knows SNL member Colin Jost’s brother. And, it just so happens, that brother gave Meyers a home video of Jost as a child.]]> <![CDATA[Emotional 'Tonight' Interview With Jonah Hill]]> Fri, 05 Feb 2016 03:38:13 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/EMOTIONAL_Screen-Shot-2016-02-05-at-2.05.55-AM.jpg Jimmy Fallon and Jonah have a conversation with each other while adapting to random emotional situations.]]> <![CDATA[Puppies Predict Super Bowl 50]]> Fri, 05 Feb 2016 03:33:19 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/PUPPIES_Screen-Shot-2016-02-05-at-2.08.17-AM.jpg Jimmy Fallon welcomes back his panel of puppies to predict the results of the Super Bowl matchup between the Carolina Panthers and the Denver Broncos.]]> <![CDATA[See Photos of Maurice White Through the Years]]> Thu, 04 Feb 2016 18:44:15 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/th-maurice-GettyImages-83092635.jpg Take a look at the life of Maurice White, founder of Earth, Wind & Fire.

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA['SNL' Feels the Bern With Larry David]]> Thu, 04 Feb 2016 13:40:16 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/NUP_172453_0001.JPG

Bristol Palin recently returned to the headlines by panning Tina Fey and "Saturday Night Live" for mocking the verbal yo-yo exhibition her mother put on while endorsing Donald Trump last month. "Saturday Night Live and Fey have been clinging to this impersonation a little too long," the younger Palin wrote in a blog post. "It's getting pathetic."

Sure, Fey debuted her Sarah Palin imitation in 2008, which seems like eons ago in the national political timeline. But the former "Weekend Update" anchor's latest "SNL" gig didn't feel old as much as old school: She offered a master class in meta comedy by lampooning a performance by Palin that played to many like a Tina Fey caricature.

Fey's return came in an "SNL" election year season in which comedians boasting long histories with the show are taking center stage. Amy Poehler donned her 2008 Hillary Clinton wig and frosty smile for a dueling Hillarys bit with current cast member Kate McKinnon. Former cast member and current "SNL" announcer Darrell Hammond has pulled double duty with his dead-on Trump and Bill Clinton impressions.

But "Seinfeld" co-creator Larry David stands out as the season's most ballyhooed cameo-maker, with two appearances as Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders. And why not: They look alike. They sound alike. They grew up just six years and a couple of Brooklyn neighborhoods apart.

They both come across as agitated contrarians who sweat the details (David as Sanders assailing big banks: "Why do they chain all their pens to the desk?").

"SNL" gets to feel the Bern this weekend when David hosts for the first time, fresh off Sanders' strong showing in the Iowa caucuses. Both men, to put it in cheesy Seinfeldian terms, are as hot as one of George Steinbrenner's favorite calzones.

David's grumpy persona won't allow him show whether he's feeling - to borrow his own favorite phrase - pretty, pretty, pretty good about hosting a show after seemingly burning his bridges three decades ago during a brief stint as a writer.

The off-told story goes like this: David, who was having trouble getting sketches on the air, quit in dramatic fashion and stormed out. He later panicked and returned to work as if nothing happened.

If that sounds familiar, it's because David used his experience as fodder for his self-destructive TV alter ego, George Costanza, on "Seinfeld," the show that made him rich, though not immediately famous.

David's gained a post-"Seinfeld" following through his HBO show, "Curb Your Enthusiasm." His recent turn in his Broadway play, "A Fish in the Dark," offered a showcase for live performing chops left largely dormant since his stand-up days and his role on the short-lived early 1980s ABC sketch show "Fridays."

Like Sanders, David's acquired-taste appeal crosses age groups. The comic's public detente with "SNL" started with his cameo on last year's 40th anniversary special, which brought together decades worth of performers, with little sign of generation gaps.

"SNL" isn't "pathetic," as Bristol Palin suggests, as much as keeping up with the times - even when that means turning back the clock.  

Jere Hester is Director of News Products and Projects at the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism. He is also the author of "Raising a Beatle Baby: How John, Paul, George and Ringo Helped us Come Together as a Family." Follow him on Twitter. 



Photo Credit: Dana Edelson/NBC
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<![CDATA[Fallon Impersonates Trump: 1st Is the Worst, 2nd Is Best]]> Thu, 04 Feb 2016 11:10:43 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/TRUMP_Screen-Shot-2016-02-04-at-1.07.45-AM.jpg Jimmy Fallon imitates Donald Trump addressing his second-place finish in the Iowa Caucus.]]> <![CDATA['Late Night': Matt Harvey's Locker Room Mistakes]]> Thu, 04 Feb 2016 01:56:13 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/LOCKER_Screen-Shot-2016-02-04-at-1.13.21-AM.jpg Matt Harvey answers "Late Night" host Seth Meyers’ questions about what life is like in the locker room. ]]> <![CDATA[5-Second Summaries With Martin Scorsese]]> Thu, 04 Feb 2016 01:44:02 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/5SEC_Screen-Shot-2016-02-04-at-1.04.30-AM.jpg Jimmy Fallon and Martin Scorsese race the clock to summarize movie plots, trying to get each other to guess the title.]]> <![CDATA['Making a Murderer' Bomb Threat]]> Thu, 04 Feb 2016 07:13:30 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/AP_07021209678.jpg

A caller who made a bomb threat to the Wisconsin sheriff's office at the center of the popular Netflix series “Making a Murderer” mentioned "getting justice for Steven."

The Manitowoc Police Department confirmed that the county’s dispatch center received a bomb threat around 6:40 p.m.

"There are bombs inside the sheriff's office already and that there was a vehicle with explosive devices in it, in the parking lot,” the caller said, according to police.

The caller also discussed "getting Justice for Steven” during the conversation, according to police.

Bomb sniffing K-9 units went over the office and the parking lot and all locations have been cleared, the department said.

No devices have been found, police said. The investigation into the calls is ongoing.

The Netflix documentary "Making a Murderer" is set in Manitowoc County. It tells the story of Steven Avery, a man who stayed in prison for 18 years for a rape he didn't commit, but was later convicted of murdering 25-year-old photographer Teresa Halbach.

The series suggests the possibility that Manitowoc County sheriff's deputies planted evidence in the case.



Photo Credit: AP
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<![CDATA[ 'Late Night:' Matt Harvey Talks Fashion Week and the MLB Offseason]]> Thu, 04 Feb 2016 01:53:04 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/OFFSEASON_Screen-Shot-2016-02-04-at-1.09.06-AM.jpg Matt Harvey tells host Seth Meyers that after Baseball season is over, the team will take about a month and a half off before they begin training again.]]> <![CDATA[Top Celeb Pics: 'Zoolander 2' Premiere]]> Sat, 06 Feb 2016 02:05:09 -0500 http://media.nbcwashington.com/images/213*120/Union-Ross-Peele-NAACP-GettyImages-508650712.jpg Check out the latest photos of your favorite celebrities looking their best. ]]>