Worth the Trip
Our daily look at deals and getaways

Insider Deals with the Presidents Passport

Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    Getty Images

    Living not far from an area where three U.S. Presidents built their humble abodes will work in your advantage this year with the Presidents Passport. This one-of-a-kind (and free) passport will give you over 50 exclusive offers around the greater Charlottesville, Va., area, about two and a half hours from D.C. 

    The Presidents Passport invites you to experience the enriching atmosphere that surrounds the greater Charlottesville, Albermarle and Orange County areas of Virginia. You'll have your pick from 17+ accomodations and at least 19 wineries, breweries and restaurants that were specially selected to give you the best money saving deals around. 
    Enjoy free wine tastings, discounts on hotels and reduced admission to historic sites with the passport. If you travel by train, get 40 percent off a companion ticket with the purchase of one round-trip fare. 
      
    If you visit Montpelier, view the newly restored 1910 Train Depot. This once-segragated train depot will showcase the less than ideal conditions that African-Americans lived through -- e.g. seperate rooms labeled "white and "colored."
    At Ash Lawn-Highland, visit a plantation where all 535 acres are full of roving animals like sheep, peacocks (we love peacocks) and chickens. You can also spend some quaint time rolling hoops on the lawn. 
    At Monticello, step into the rarely seen rooms on the second and thrid floors, including Jefferson's yellow dome room
    You can sign up for the free Presidents Passport online, and print any offers you want to use. Get a keepsake stamp of all three presidents at ticket counters of the the Monticello, Charlottseville and Montpelier visitors bureaus. The offer is valid through Dec. 31, 2012. 

    Exhibit Explores Jefferson's Connection With Slaves

    [DC] Exhibit Explores Jefferson's Connection With Slaves
    A new exhibit at the National Museum of American History explores the lives of slaves owned by Thomas Jefferson.