Weintraub Did D.C., Everything Else "His Way" | NBC4 Washington
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Weintraub Did D.C., Everything Else "His Way"

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Before you feel misled, keep in mind that "His Way" is not about Frank Sinatra; that was "My Way." No, "His Way" is a documentary that premiered on HBO Monday, about legendary Hollywood film producer Jerry Weintraub .

    Weintraub’s childhood mixed a modest life, a rough neighborhood in the Bronx, a united family and a father who left an indelible imprint on his life as a charming and determined gem dealer. This would be the combination that jumped started a truly remarkable life.

    As a young man, Weintraub embraced any opportunity to make money and dared everything to up the ante.

    From multiple petty jobs to concert promoter, Weintraub gained access to talent and celebrities via hard work and serendipity and landed on the doorsteps of Elvis Presley, John Denver and even Frank Sinatra as their promoter. Film work was not far behind.

    The title of the movie itself reflects what those who know him claim -- that he always gets his way.

    Fortunately, that's not necessarily a bad thing if you examine his body of work, which includes "The  Karate Kid," "National Lampoon's Vegas Vacation" and the "Ocean's Eleven" trilogy, which he also appeared in.

    In 1991 he was named to the board of the prestigious Kennedy Center, which takes us to Washington, but that was not before a long history with the city and its most famous residents and visitors. His Sinatra connections served him well, and he hobnobbed with American royalty.
     
    Entrepreneur and renaissance man Wyatt Dickerson talked to Niteside about his own relationship with Sinatra and what Washington was like during the Camelot and Reagan years.

    “Sinatra’s ties to Washington were legendary. First, with the election of John F. Kennedy and later with President Ronald Reagan. “

    Dickerson, famous in his own right, owned the popular Pisces watering hole for dignitaries and celebrs. The District has never quite been able to duplicate the genius of the club, the voice of Sinatra and the tenacity of Weintraub.

    Weintraub also entered the circle of the first set of Bushes. Former First Lady Barbara was amused by him: “kind of a rare bird,” she called him.