POLL: Clinton, Trump Hold Big Leads in Maryland | NBC4 Washington
Decision 2016

Decision 2016

Full coverage of the race for the White House

POLL: Clinton, Trump Hold Big Leads in Maryland

Trump polled well with likely Republican primary voters who do not have a college degree, earn less than $50,000 per year and do not practice a religion

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Getty Images, File
    Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton; Donald Trump.

    What to Know

    • Clinton holds a 22-point lead over Sanders, and Trump holds a 12-point lead against Cruz, the NBC4-Marist Maryland Poll says.

    • Clinton would beat Trump by 36 points in Maryland if the two were matched up in the general election, the poll results show.

    Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump each hold big leads against their party rivals in the race for the presidency in Maryland, poll results released Tuesday show.

    Clinton, the former secretary of state, holds a 22-point lead over Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, according to the NBC4/Marist Maryland Poll conducted this month.

    Among the Republican primary electorate polled, Trump holds a 12-point lead against Texas Sen. Ted Cruz.

    “If the front-runners maintain their leads, Trump and Clinton remain on the path to securing their respective party’s nomination,” said Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion. “With two weeks to go to the Maryland primary, their rivals need to find a way to close the gap.”

    Fifty-eight percent of likely Democratic primary voters polled said they would support Clinton. 36 percent said they would vote for Sanders. These results, ahead of the April 26 primary election, have a margin of error of plus or minus 3.5 percentage points.

    Trump won 41 percent of likely Republican primary voters. Cruz won 29 percent, Ohio Gov. John Kasich won 24 percent and just 6 percent of these voters were undecided. These results have a margin of error of plus or minus 5.1 percentage points.

    Clinton polled particularly well with women, African Americans and people age 45 and older. Sanders polled better with people under age 45.

    Trump polled well with likely Republican primary voters who do not have a college degree, earn less than $50,000 per year and do not practice a religion. Cruz and Trump were competitive in winning the votes of women and white evangelical Christians. Kasich led among likely Republican primary voters who described themselves as moderate.

    A high percentage of Trump supporters said they were committed to their candidate selection. 71 percent of likely Republican primary voters supporting Trump said they were firmly committed to him. 51 percent of Cruz voters said they were committed to him, and 44 percent of Kasich backers said they were committed to him.

    Asked who their second choice for Republican presidential candidate would be, 35 percent of likely Republican primary voters polled said Kasich, 34 percent said Cruz and 17 percent said Trump.

    Who Could Win the General Election?

    Clinton would beat Trump by 36 points in Maryland if the two were matched up in the general election, the results show.

    Clinton commanded 63 percent of registered voters in the match-up. Trump won 27 percent, and 10 percent of people were undecided. The match-up results all had a margin of error of plus or minus 2.7 percentage points.

    If Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and businessman Trump went head to head, 65 percent of Maryland voters polled said they would pick Sanders. 26 percent said they would pick Trump.

    If Clinton and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz were matched up, 60 percent of Maryland voters polled said they would pick Clinton. 31 percent said they would pick Cruz.

    President Obama's and Gov. Hogan's Approval Ratings

    Most Maryland residents polled said they supported President Barack Obama and Gov. Larry Hogan. About two-thirds of Maryland residents said they approved of how Hogan was doing his job. 15 percent of people polled said they disapproved, and 18 percent were not sure. 62 percent of residents polled approved of how Obama was doing his job. 32 percent disapproved, and 6 percent were not sure.

    The NBC4/Marist Maryland Poll, conducted April 5 through April 9, surveyed a total of 2,563 registered voters, including 775 likely Democratic primary voters and 368 likely Republican primary voters.